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Wednesday, February 28th 2007, 1:37am

New Russian ships for 1934

Leading off is a class of 2 aircraft carriers, marginal improvements on the Kulikovo class of 1930:

Chesma class, Russian Aircraft Carrier laid down 1934

Chesma, Sevastopol

Displacement:
16,485 t light; 16,988 t standard; 19,372 t normal; 21,279 t full load

Dimensions: Length overall / water x beam x draught
751.08 ft / 721.78 ft x 73.82 ft (Bulges 80.38 ft) x 22.47 ft (normal load)
228.93 m / 220.00 m x 22.50 m (Bulges 24.50 m) x 6.85 m

Armament:
12 - 5.12" / 130 mm guns (4x3 guns), 79.37lbs / 36.00kg shells, 1934 Model
Dual purpose guns in deck mounts with hoists
on side, all amidships, 2 raised mounts - superfiring
32 - 1.46" / 37.0 mm guns (8x4 guns), 1.55lbs / 0.70kg shells, 1934 Model
Dual purpose guns in deck mounts with hoists
on side, evenly spread, all raised mounts
Weight of broadside 1,002 lbs / 454 kg
Shells per gun, main battery: 200

Armour:
- Belts: Width (max) Length (avg) Height (avg)
Main: 2.95" / 75 mm 459.32 ft / 140.00 m 9.84 ft / 3.00 m
Ends: Unarmoured
Upper: 0.98" / 25 mm 590.55 ft / 180.00 m 19.69 ft / 6.00 m
Main Belt covers 98 % of normal length

- Gun armour: Face (max) Other gunhouse (avg) Barbette/hoist (max)
Main: 0.98" / 25 mm 0.20" / 5 mm -
2nd: 0.98" / 25 mm 0.20" / 5 mm -

- Armour deck: 1.97" / 50 mm, Conning tower: 2.95" / 75 mm

Machinery:
Oil fired boilers, steam turbines,
Geared drive, 4 shafts, 82,458 shp / 61,513 Kw = 30.00 kts
Range 13,500nm at 15.00 kts
Bunker at max displacement = 4,292 tons

Complement:
820 - 1,067

Cost:
£4.903 million / $19.612 million

Distribution of weights at normal displacement:
Armament: 107 tons, 0.6 %
Armour: 2,459 tons, 12.7 %
- Belts: 1,020 tons, 5.3 %
- Torpedo bulkhead: 0 tons, 0.0 %
- Armament: 23 tons, 0.1 %
- Armour Deck: 1,370 tons, 7.1 %
- Conning Tower: 46 tons, 0.2 %
Machinery: 2,372 tons, 12.2 %
Hull, fittings & equipment: 6,247 tons, 32.3 %
Fuel, ammunition & stores: 2,887 tons, 14.9 %
Miscellaneous weights: 5,300 tons, 27.4 %

Overall survivability and seakeeping ability:
Survivability (Non-critical penetrating hits needed to sink ship):
29,611 lbs / 13,431 Kg = 441.7 x 5.1 " / 130 mm shells or 3.1 torpedoes
Stability (Unstable if below 1.00): 1.11
Metacentric height 3.9 ft / 1.2 m
Roll period: 17.2 seconds
Steadiness - As gun platform (Average = 50 %): 71 %
- Recoil effect (Restricted arc if above 1.00): 0.12
Seaboat quality (Average = 1.00): 1.51

Hull form characteristics:
Hull has rise forward of midbreak
and transom stern
Block coefficient: 0.520
Length to Beam Ratio: 8.98 : 1
'Natural speed' for length: 30.85 kts
Power going to wave formation at top speed: 49 %
Trim (Max stability = 0, Max steadiness = 100): 47
Bow angle (Positive = bow angles forward): 30.00 degrees
Stern overhang: 6.56 ft / 2.00 m
Freeboard (% = measuring location as a percentage of overall length):
- Stem: 39.37 ft / 12.00 m
- Forecastle (25 %): 27.89 ft / 8.50 m
- Mid (50 %): 27.89 ft / 8.50 m (16.40 ft / 5.00 m aft of break)
- Quarterdeck (15 %): 16.40 ft / 5.00 m
- Stern: 16.40 ft / 5.00 m
- Average freeboard: 23.29 ft / 7.10 m

Ship space, strength and comments:
Space - Hull below water (magazines/engines, low = better): 74.7 %
- Above water (accommodation/working, high = better): 185.2 %
Waterplane Area: 37,619 Square feet or 3,495 Square metres
Displacement factor (Displacement / loading): 145 %
Structure weight / hull surface area: 108 lbs/sq ft or 530 Kg/sq metre
Hull strength (Relative):
- Cross-sectional: 0.99
- Longitudinal: 1.09
- Overall: 1.00
Hull space for machinery, storage, compartmentation is excellent
Room for accommodation and workspaces is excellent
Ship has slow, easy roll, a good, steady gun platform
Excellent seaboat, comfortable, can fire her guns in the heaviest weather

70 aircraft, plus 20 spares

Semiautomatic twin 130mm simmed as triples


In a related news item, Russian Federation Navy announced that battleship Sevastopol will be removed from service early in 1934 and scrapped. Ger armaments will be incorporated into coastal defenses vicinity the oil export port of Okha on Sakhalin Island.

Next is a class of 2 light cruisers, intended for protecting aircraft carriers against aerial and surface threats;

Tambov class, Russian Light Cruiser laid down 1934

Displacement:
5,495 t light; 5,759 t standard; 7,021 t normal; 8,030 t full load

Dimensions: Length overall / water x beam x draught
544.04 ft / 536.75 ft x 51.51 ft x 19.75 ft (normal load)
165.82 m / 163.60 m x 15.70 m x 6.02 m

Armament:
6 - 5.98" / 152 mm guns (3x2 guns), 123.46lbs / 56.00kg shells, 1934 Model
Breech loading guns in turrets (on barbettes)
on centreline ends, majority forward, 1 raised mount - superfiring
2 - 3.94" / 100 mm guns (1x2 guns), 37.48lbs / 17.00kg shells, 1934 Model
Dual purpose guns in a deck mount with hoist
on centreline aft, all raised guns - superfiring
12 - 3.94" / 100 mm guns (6x2 guns), 37.48lbs / 17.00kg shells, 1934 Model
Dual purpose guns in deck mounts with hoists
on side, evenly spread, 2 raised mounts
32 - 1.46" / 37.0 mm guns (8x4 guns), 1.55lbs / 0.70kg shells, 1934 Model
Anti-aircraft guns in deck mounts with hoists
on side, evenly spread, 4 raised mounts
Weight of broadside 1,315 lbs / 596 kg
Shells per gun, main battery: 150

Armour:
- Belts: Width (max) Length (avg) Height (avg)
Main: 1.97" / 50 mm 374.34 ft / 114.10 m 9.84 ft / 3.00 m
Ends: Unarmoured
Main Belt covers 107 % of normal length

- Gun armour: Face (max) Other gunhouse (avg) Barbette/hoist (max)
Main: 1.97" / 50 mm 0.98" / 25 mm 1.18" / 30 mm
2nd: 0.98" / 25 mm 0.20" / 5 mm -
3rd: 0.98" / 25 mm 0.20" / 5 mm -

- Armour deck: 1.18" / 30 mm, Conning tower: 1.97" / 50 mm

Machinery:
Oil fired boilers, steam turbines,
Geared drive, 2 shafts, 68,598 shp / 51,174 Kw = 32.00 kts
Range 12,800nm at 15.00 kts
Bunker at max displacement = 2,271 tons

Complement:
383 - 498

Cost:
£2.878 million / $11.510 million

Distribution of weights at normal displacement:
Armament: 140 tons, 2.0 %
Armour: 785 tons, 11.2 %
- Belts: 297 tons, 4.2 %
- Torpedo bulkhead: 0 tons, 0.0 %
- Armament: 87 tons, 1.2 %
- Armour Deck: 385 tons, 5.5 %
- Conning Tower: 16 tons, 0.2 %
Machinery: 1,973 tons, 28.1 %
Hull, fittings & equipment: 2,597 tons, 37.0 %
Fuel, ammunition & stores: 1,526 tons, 21.7 %
Miscellaneous weights: 0 tons, 0.0 %

Overall survivability and seakeeping ability:
Survivability (Non-critical penetrating hits needed to sink ship):
6,942 lbs / 3,149 Kg = 64.8 x 6.0 " / 152 mm shells or 1.2 torpedoes
Stability (Unstable if below 1.00): 1.23
Metacentric height 2.7 ft / 0.8 m
Roll period: 13.1 seconds
Steadiness - As gun platform (Average = 50 %): 70 %
- Recoil effect (Restricted arc if above 1.00): 0.59
Seaboat quality (Average = 1.00): 1.25

Hull form characteristics:
Hull has a flush deck
Block coefficient: 0.450
Length to Beam Ratio: 10.42 : 1
'Natural speed' for length: 23.17 kts
Power going to wave formation at top speed: 56 %
Trim (Max stability = 0, Max steadiness = 100): 56
Bow angle (Positive = bow angles forward): 15.00 degrees
Stern overhang: 0.00 ft / 0.00 m
Freeboard (% = measuring location as a percentage of overall length):
- Stem: 27.23 ft / 8.30 m
- Forecastle (20 %): 19.69 ft / 6.00 m
- Mid (50 %): 18.04 ft / 5.50 m
- Quarterdeck (15 %): 16.40 ft / 5.00 m
- Stern: 16.40 ft / 5.00 m
- Average freeboard: 18.69 ft / 5.70 m

Ship space, strength and comments:
Space - Hull below water (magazines/engines, low = better): 107.3 %
- Above water (accommodation/working, high = better): 157.7 %
Waterplane Area: 17,635 Square feet or 1,638 Square metres
Displacement factor (Displacement / loading): 120 %
Structure weight / hull surface area: 83 lbs/sq ft or 406 Kg/sq metre
Hull strength (Relative):
- Cross-sectional: 0.84
- Longitudinal: 1.62
- Overall: 0.90
Caution: Hull subject to strain in open-sea
Hull space for machinery, storage, compartmentation is adequate
Room for accommodation and workspaces is excellent
Ship has slow, easy roll, a good, steady gun platform
Good seaboat, rides out heavy weather easily


Next is the Kiev class Torpedo Cruiser:

Kiev class, Russian Torpedo Cruiser laid down 1934

Displacement:
2,315 t light; 2,394 t standard; 2,985 t normal; 3,457 t full load

Dimensions: Length overall / water x beam x draught
499.33 ft / 475.72 ft x 41.83 ft x 13.12 ft (normal load)
152.20 m / 145.00 m x 12.75 m x 4.00 m

Armament:
4 - 5.12" / 130 mm guns (2x2 guns), 79.37lbs / 36.00kg shells, 1934 Model
Quick firing guns in deck mounts with hoists
on centreline, all forward, 1 raised mount - superfiring
4 - 1.46" / 37.0 mm guns (1x4 guns), 1.55lbs / 0.70kg shells, 1934 Model
Anti-aircraft guns in a deck mount with hoist
on centreline aft
8 - 1.46" / 37.0 mm guns (4x2 guns), 1.55lbs / 0.70kg shells, 1934 Model
Anti-aircraft guns in deck mounts with hoists
on side, evenly spread
Weight of broadside 336 lbs / 152 kg
Shells per gun, main battery: 100
12 - 25.6" / 650 mm above water torpedoes

Armour:
- Gun armour: Face (max) Other gunhouse (avg) Barbette/hoist (max)
Main: 3.54" / 90 mm 0.20" / 5 mm 2.76" / 70 mm
2nd: 0.98" / 25 mm 0.20" / 5 mm -
3rd: 0.98" / 25 mm 0.20" / 5 mm -

- Conning tower: 3.54" / 90 mm

Machinery:
Oil fired boilers, steam turbines,
Geared drive, 2 shafts, 50,513 shp / 37,683 Kw = 35.00 kts
Range 10,400nm at 15.00 kts
Bunker at max displacement = 1,062 tons

Complement:
201 - 262

Cost:
£1.513 million / $6.051 million

Distribution of weights at normal displacement:
Armament: 36 tons, 1.2 %
Armour: 39 tons, 1.3 %
- Belts: 0 tons, 0.0 %
- Torpedo bulkhead: 0 tons, 0.0 %
- Armament: 23 tons, 0.8 %
- Armour Deck: 0 tons, 0.0 %
- Conning Tower: 16 tons, 0.5 %
Machinery: 1,407 tons, 47.2 %
Hull, fittings & equipment: 834 tons, 27.9 %
Fuel, ammunition & stores: 669 tons, 22.4 %
Miscellaneous weights: 0 tons, 0.0 %

Overall survivability and seakeeping ability:
Survivability (Non-critical penetrating hits needed to sink ship):
990 lbs / 449 Kg = 14.8 x 5.1 " / 130 mm shells or 0.4 torpedoes
Stability (Unstable if below 1.00): 1.42
Metacentric height 2.5 ft / 0.8 m
Roll period: 11.1 seconds
Steadiness - As gun platform (Average = 50 %): 70 %
- Recoil effect (Restricted arc if above 1.00): 0.26
Seaboat quality (Average = 1.00): 1.20

Hull form characteristics:
Hull has rise forward of midbreak
and transom stern
Block coefficient: 0.400
Length to Beam Ratio: 11.37 : 1
'Natural speed' for length: 24.97 kts
Power going to wave formation at top speed: 60 %
Trim (Max stability = 0, Max steadiness = 100): 58
Bow angle (Positive = bow angles forward): 30.00 degrees
Stern overhang: 6.56 ft / 2.00 m
Freeboard (% = measuring location as a percentage of overall length):
- Stem: 29.53 ft / 9.00 m
- Forecastle (25 %): 19.69 ft / 6.00 m
- Mid (40 %): 19.69 ft / 6.00 m (12.30 ft / 3.75 m aft of break)
- Quarterdeck (15 %): 12.30 ft / 3.75 m
- Stern: 13.29 ft / 4.05 m
- Average freeboard: 16.31 ft / 4.97 m

Ship space, strength and comments:
Space - Hull below water (magazines/engines, low = better): 161.5 %
- Above water (accommodation/working, high = better): 65.3 %
Waterplane Area: 12,712 Square feet or 1,181 Square metres
Displacement factor (Displacement / loading): 92 %
Structure weight / hull surface area: 38 lbs/sq ft or 184 Kg/sq metre
Hull strength (Relative):
- Cross-sectional: 0.50
- Longitudinal: 1.03
- Overall: 0.53
Hull space for machinery, storage, compartmentation is cramped
Room for accommodation and workspaces is cramped
Ship has slow, easy roll, a good, steady gun platform
Good seaboat, rides out heavy weather easily

Torpedos in four triple mounts on the centerlineKiev class, Russian Torpedo Cruiser laid down 1934


And two flotillas of Bucharskiy class destroyers will be replaced by the Vinnitsa class:

Vinnitsa class, Russian Destroyer laid down 1934

Displacement:
1,408 t light; 1,478 t standard; 1,692 t normal; 1,863 t full load

Dimensions: Length overall / water x beam x draught
367.45 ft / 367.45 ft x 32.32 ft x 12.47 ft (normal load)
112.00 m / 112.00 m x 9.85 m x 3.80 m

Armament:
3 - 5.12" / 130 mm guns in single mounts, 79.37lbs / 36.00kg shells, 1934 Model
Breech loading guns in deck mounts
on centreline ends, majority forward, 1 raised mount
4 - 1.46" / 37.0 mm guns (1x4 guns), 1.55lbs / 0.70kg shells, 1934 Model
Anti-aircraft guns in a deck mount with hoist
on centreline aft, all raised guns - superfiring
4 - 1.46" / 37.0 mm guns (2x2 guns), 1.55lbs / 0.70kg shells, 1934 Model
Anti-aircraft guns in deck mounts with hoists
on side, all amidships
4 - 0.50" / 12.7 mm guns in single mounts, 0.06lbs / 0.03kg shells, 1934 Model
Machine guns in deck mounts
on side, evenly spread
Weight of broadside 251 lbs / 114 kg
Shells per gun, main battery: 250
9 - 21.0" / 533 mm above water torpedoes

Armour:
- Gun armour: Face (max) Other gunhouse (avg) Barbette/hoist (max)
Main: 0.98" / 25 mm 0.20" / 5 mm -
2nd: 0.98" / 25 mm 0.20" / 5 mm -
3rd: 0.98" / 25 mm 0.20" / 5 mm -

- Conning tower: 0.98" / 25 mm

Machinery:
Oil fired boilers, steam turbines,
Geared drive, 2 shafts, 37,501 shp / 27,976 Kw = 34.50 kts
Range 5,250nm at 15.00 kts
Bunker at max displacement = 385 tons

Complement:
131 - 171

Cost:
£0.939 million / $3.754 million

Distribution of weights at normal displacement:
Armament: 27 tons, 1.6 %
Armour: 11 tons, 0.6 %
- Belts: 0 tons, 0.0 %
- Torpedo bulkhead: 0 tons, 0.0 %
- Armament: 8 tons, 0.5 %
- Armour Deck: 0 tons, 0.0 %
- Conning Tower: 3 tons, 0.2 %
Machinery: 853 tons, 50.4 %
Hull, fittings & equipment: 488 tons, 28.8 %
Fuel, ammunition & stores: 284 tons, 16.8 %
Miscellaneous weights: 30 tons, 1.8 %

Overall survivability and seakeeping ability:
Survivability (Non-critical penetrating hits needed to sink ship):
476 lbs / 216 Kg = 7.1 x 5.1 " / 130 mm shells or 0.3 torpedoes
Stability (Unstable if below 1.00): 1.32
Metacentric height 1.5 ft / 0.5 m
Roll period: 11.1 seconds
Steadiness - As gun platform (Average = 50 %): 70 %
- Recoil effect (Restricted arc if above 1.00): 0.29
Seaboat quality (Average = 1.00): 1.11

Hull form characteristics:
Hull has rise forward of midbreak
and transom stern
Block coefficient: 0.400
Length to Beam Ratio: 11.37 : 1
'Natural speed' for length: 21.94 kts
Power going to wave formation at top speed: 66 %
Trim (Max stability = 0, Max steadiness = 100): 63
Bow angle (Positive = bow angles forward): 0.00 degrees
Stern overhang: 0.00 ft / 0.00 m
Freeboard (% = measuring location as a percentage of overall length):
- Stem: 24.28 ft / 7.40 m
- Forecastle (20 %): 17.72 ft / 5.40 m
- Mid (50 %): 17.72 ft / 5.40 m (10.17 ft / 3.10 m aft of break)
- Quarterdeck (15 %): 10.17 ft / 3.10 m
- Stern: 11.15 ft / 3.40 m
- Average freeboard: 14.54 ft / 4.43 m

Ship space, strength and comments:
Space - Hull below water (magazines/engines, low = better): 178.0 %
- Above water (accommodation/working, high = better): 72.1 %
Waterplane Area: 7,586 Square feet or 705 Square metres
Displacement factor (Displacement / loading): 70 %
Structure weight / hull surface area: 32 lbs/sq ft or 154 Kg/sq metre
Hull strength (Relative):
- Cross-sectional: 0.50
- Longitudinal: 1.84
- Overall: 0.56
Hull space for machinery, storage, compartmentation is cramped
Room for accommodation and workspaces is cramped
Ship has slow, easy roll, a good, steady gun platform



Edit: Removed double posting of some of Kiev's stats.

This post has been edited 5 times, last edit by "AdmKuznetsov" (Feb 28th 2007, 6:21pm)


2

Wednesday, February 28th 2007, 2:08am

On the Kiev class, you probably don't want the 130mm guns as quick firing, that's getting pretty heavy for most navies for a man to manhandle.

3

Wednesday, February 28th 2007, 2:31am

What about the American 5" and British 5.25", were they not man handled?

4

Wednesday, February 28th 2007, 2:36am

Both of those were 2-piece rounds (ie, projectile and propellent cartridge are separately handled and loaded), not a single fixed round (which is what quick-firing means).

This post has been edited 1 times, last edit by "Hrolf Hakonson" (Feb 28th 2007, 2:37am)


HoOmAn

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5

Wednesday, February 28th 2007, 12:48pm

There are a few designs with vera high l:b ratios, transome sterns, low BCs for their size and very high bunkerage to get down their size....

I´m not going to start THAT discussion again. I´m tired of it. So I just state my opinion: I don´t like them and IMHO those designs would have real problems in OTL with highly stressed hulls.

6

Thursday, March 1st 2007, 12:43am

The high bunkerage business works. However it comes at a price and lately I have been wondering if it is really worth it to waste all the valuable hull strength on the many hundreds of tons of additional fuel which could be better spent on other aspects of the ship...

Example: Earlier today, I changed the range on one of my BB designs from 11,000nm at 20 knots to 10,000nm at 15 knots. I altered the dimensions so I would be back at the same standard displacement. I went from a hull strength of 1.00 of the 'original' sim to 1.08 in the new sim and I think that that is quite a lot.

This post has been edited 1 times, last edit by "Rooijen10" (Mar 1st 2007, 12:46am)


7

Thursday, March 1st 2007, 12:59am

650mm torpedoes.. that's scary.

Where will the torpedo-cruisers be stationed, do you imagine? I think they'd be more useful in confined waters (the baltic, say) than in the Far East..

(Keep them away from me!)

8

Thursday, March 1st 2007, 1:21am

Quoted

Originally posted by HoOmAn
There are a few designs with vera high l:b ratios, transome sterns, low BCs for their size and very high bunkerage to get down their size....

I´m not going to start THAT discussion again. I´m tired of it. So I just state my opinion: I don´t like them and IMHO those designs would have real problems in OTL with highly stressed hulls.


According to the current gentlemans rules...

Point 2: Length:Beam ratio.
(as currently proposed)
a) Ships of 8000 tons and smaller => maximum 12:1
b) Ships bigger than 8000 tons => maximum 10:1

If theres an issue, I'd like to put it to rest once and for all....

Kaiser Kirk

Lightbringer and former European Imperialist

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9

Thursday, March 1st 2007, 2:21am

Quoted

Originally posted by Alikchi
650mm torpedoes.. that's scary.

Where will the torpedo-cruisers be stationed, do you imagine? I think they'd be more useful in confined waters (the baltic, say) than in the Far East..

(Keep them away from me!)


Missed that part. 26" torps, ouch. Historically used for Russian Nuclear Torps. Could we at least see some miscellaneous weight on that cruiser to account for the ~24+ standard tons worth of torpedoes ?

Also, presuming the Torps are about 7m long each, and there are 4 centerline mounts, thats 28m or nearly 20% of your length that has to be clear. Will all weapons fit?

Hmm do I hear bids for 700mm torpedoes, 750, 800 ? 800 going once, twice, Ahh the Gentleman with the..pet white mouse... sold to Mr. ....

This post has been edited 1 times, last edit by "Kaiser Kirk" (Mar 1st 2007, 2:27am)


10

Thursday, March 1st 2007, 2:39am

Also standard for Russian wake-homing torps, and one of their sub-launched anti-sub missiles (SS-N-16). The Imperial German Navy looked at a 700mm torpedo that was around 9m in length late in WWI, but as far as I know no real work was done on it.

This post has been edited 1 times, last edit by "Hrolf Hakonson" (Mar 1st 2007, 2:59am)


Kaiser Kirk

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11

Thursday, March 1st 2007, 3:11am

The page I was looking at listed the 650mm wake homing as a subsequent development of the 650mm nuclear version.

As for length, 7m was simply what Dutch 21" were, others were shorter or longer. You reference a 700mm at 9m, while the 650s above were 11m, either of which would make the deck space difficult.

On the other hand, at 145m she is longer than many destroyers sporting a similar weapons outfit.

12

Thursday, March 1st 2007, 3:21am

Bunkerage issue

Russia's experience of her last two naval wars drives the requirement for long range. The lesson of the Russo-Japanese War is that Russian fleets may have to steam long distances to get to where they need to be. The lesson of the Great War is that Russian ports that are geographically blocked are no place to base Russian seapower. Before the Great War, Russia's trade was conducted through the Black Sea and the Baltic Sea. Once war broke out, Russia's access to the World Ocean was essentially cut off, except for tiny trickles through Arkhangelsk and Vladivostok. This had a dire impact on Russia's economy and war effort, and was a huge factor in the failure of the Russian war effort.

This led the Russian Naval Staff to conclude that the main base of Russian sepower should be at Murmansk, since it is the port with the best access to the ocean that Russia has.

However, the isolation of the main Russian naval base at Murmansk requires that Russian ships steam a long distance before they get to where the action is, and then return. The global network of French bases is a big help, but still does not overcome Russia's unfavorable maritime geography.

Large bunkerage does.

For the Torpedo cruisers, the eventual plan is to have a Squadron with each of the major fleets. And not only are they long, their 130mm armament is grouped forward and 60% of their length is aft of the mid-break. Besides the torpedos, the aft armament is a centerline quad 37mm and 4 dual 37mm on the sides.

This post has been edited 2 times, last edit by "AdmKuznetsov" (Mar 1st 2007, 3:34am)


HoOmAn

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13

Thursday, March 1st 2007, 9:51am

Quoted

Originally posted by thesmilingassassin

Quoted

Originally posted by HoOmAn
There are a few designs with vera high l:b ratios, transome sterns, low BCs for their size and very high bunkerage to get down their size....

I´m not going to start THAT discussion again. I´m tired of it. So I just state my opinion: I don´t like them and IMHO those designs would have real problems in OTL with highly stressed hulls.


According to the current gentlemans rules...

Point 2: Length:Beam ratio.
(as currently proposed)
a) Ships of 8000 tons and smaller => maximum 12:1
b) Ships bigger than 8000 tons => maximum 10:1

If theres an issue, I'd like to put it to rest once and for all....


No, no, all within the rules. I was referring to a different discussion, not our GRs....

14

Thursday, March 1st 2007, 9:53am

Quoted

Hmm do I hear bids for 700mm torpedoes, 750, 800 ? 800 going once, twice, Ahh the Gentleman with the..pet white mouse... sold to Mr. ....


The RAF trumps them all with the 38" (965mm) x 29ft "Helmover" Torpedo. Radio guided with a range of 50 miles.

That was the small version that fit into a Lancaster's bombbay.

The ship launched version was 38" x 49ft and weighed nearly 10 tons. 150mile range.

This post has been edited 1 times, last edit by "Red Admiral" (Mar 1st 2007, 9:57am)


HoOmAn

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15

Thursday, March 1st 2007, 9:55am

How long until you can launch mini-subs from inside these tubes?! 8)

16

Thursday, March 1st 2007, 10:51am

Quoted

Originally posted by Red Admiral
The RAF trumps them all with the 38" (965mm) x 29ft "Helmover" Torpedo. Radio guided with a range of 50 miles.

That was the small version that fit into a Lancaster's bombbay.

The ship launched version was 38" x 49ft and weighed nearly 10 tons. 150mile range.


...and the sound of Canadian shipwrights hard at work is once again heard...

17

Thursday, March 1st 2007, 3:51pm

"What are we doing tonight, M?"

Quoted

Hmm do I hear bids for 700mm torpedoes, 750, 800 ? 800 going once, twice, Ahh the Gentleman with the..pet white mouse... sold to Mr. ....


8)


Quoted

...and the sound of Canadian shipwrights hard at work is once again heard...

...wait a minute, I thought the Philippines had the copyright on the BIG BANG™ theory of naval development. :P

18

Thursday, March 1st 2007, 4:04pm

Canadians are working on the "Great Air Burst or Bust" Theory.