You are not logged in.

Dear visitor, welcome to WesWorld. If this is your first visit here, please read the Help. It explains in detail how this page works. To use all features of this page, you should consider registering. Please use the registration form, to register here or read more information about the registration process. If you are already registered, please login here.

41

Monday, November 27th 2017, 6:54pm

Quoted

the Zhuhai is outside what Russia claims as the 3nm territorial water boundary; but it's inside the 12nm limit that (if I recall correctly) China claims. The Chinese are thus in a murky gray area regarding "territorial waters". While both Russia and the US may still claim the 3-mile limit (for now), the Zhuhai cannot pass the Bering Strait without getting within the 12-nm limit that China itself claims.

As far as I know, the Russians also claim 12nm as the limit of territorial waters and that claim was made a long time ago (early days with Adm K.). Therefore, since China also claims 12nm as the limits of their territorial waters, they should respect Russia's claim.

Also did a quick measurement with Google Earth and Big Diomede Island is ~20nm from the Russian mainland so the 12nm limit from the mainland and Big Diomede island will overlap. Passing west of the Island means passing through Russian territorial waters.

Quoted

we are still in international waters - Position 65.60 ° North 168.94° West - CEC"

No they are not... That position actually puts them at less than 6nm of Big Diomede Island which is well within Russian Territorial waters. I think the Russians are extremely generous letting the Chinese that close.

Quoted

I see several issues with SOP Step 3 - if it is even possible, getting a reconnaissance aircraft to the vicinity of the Bering Strait will take time. Detouring around Russian, Chosenian, and Japanese air space will require very inventive navigation. I am also wondering if it is even useful in this instance.

Well, a one-way trip directly to that area is already about 4000 kilometers. Looking at the recon planes in the Chinese ency, none of them have a range of 8000 km and they would still need extra fuel in order to hang around the area for a while... so I guess that the plane would need to have a range of at least 10,000 kilometers. Now take the detour into account, a plane from Taiwan would have to fly more than 7000 kilometers just to get to the area and would probably need ~17000 km range minimum.

Quoted

I understand your "issues", but it is the fastest possible way of help and "showing" flag in this case and time. Sending ships or other "help" will sure take more time. Of course meanwhile diplomatic relations will be intensified to find for both sides a satisfactionable solution.

The problem is that the flag that needs to be shown might be shot down along the route using the fastest possible way.

42

Monday, November 27th 2017, 7:11pm

Quoted

the Zhuhai is outside what Russia claims as the 3nm territorial water boundary; but it's inside the 12nm limit that (if I recall correctly) China claims. The Chinese are thus in a murky gray area regarding "territorial waters". While both Russia and the US may still claim the 3-mile limit (for now), the Zhuhai cannot pass the Bering Strait without getting within the 12-nm limit that China itself claims.

As far as I know, the Russians also claim 12nm as the limit of territorial waters and that claim was made a long time ago (early days with Adm K.).

...hm.

A quick search doesn't outright confirm this (yet), but I've found one or two statements by AdmK that would seem to make more sense, assuming that this is correct.

Let me consider this, because if true, it will pretty substantially change the implications of what might come next.

43

Monday, November 27th 2017, 10:57pm

I have to agree with Walter, if China steadfastly claims a 12 nm limit it would seem odd that they would not recognize the same with other nations, more notably if on a peaceful mission and they did not wish to antagonize others. Also, if Walter is correct even with a 9 nm limit, Diomedes position would give the Chinese a 2 nm channel (theoretically) to sail between. That doesn't leave much for error, sailing on the east side seemed like a better choice....and popcorn sales would suffer.

44

Tuesday, November 28th 2017, 10:55am

I have to agree with Walter, if China steadfastly claims a 12 nm limit it would seem odd that they would not recognize the same with other nations, more notably if on a peaceful mission and they did not wish to antagonize others. Also, if Walter is correct even with a 9 nm limit, Diomedes position would give the Chinese a 2 nm channel (theoretically) to sail between. That doesn't leave much for error, sailing on the east side seemed like a better choice....and popcorn sales would suffer.


A final statement from my side:

Brock had written the coordinates without talking to me, so equal what you are all thinking and equal what the coordinates say ..... all this happens in international waters. And I think that's what he also intended.

And i think Brock will agree with me.

45

Tuesday, November 28th 2017, 11:17am

I'm just waiting for the storyline! Hurry up I need to get some popcorn ready!!

46

Wednesday, November 29th 2017, 10:31am

Thursday 5. February - late evening - Forbidden City Beijing

The Russian Ambassador in Beijing is immediately being summoned to the chinese government, to give an explanation about the "Zhuhai Incident" in the Bering Strait.

47

Wednesday, November 29th 2017, 4:52pm

Big Diomede Island
February 5th

"Three minutes," Leytenant Elena Borisova reported, her eye on her watch.

"No response?" Podpolkovnik Volkova said in surprise. "Certainly we have woken them up, but can they be so surprised? Very well - batteries, prepare to fire on the target v-"

"Incoming radio transmission from the target ship," Volkova's radio officer reported, leaning out from behind the curtain that separated the communication room from the rest of the command bunker.

"That's more like it," Volkova said. "Hold. Let's see what excuses these intruders have to offer for themselves." She waited impatiently as the radio officers finished jotting down the message and brought it to her, where she scanned it with criticial eye. "...'Stop firing immediately - will hold position until further notice'... They say they're stopping? Fire control, what is the target ship currently doing? Course and speed!"

"Target vessel currently slowing quickly; speed dropping below five knots. Their course appears to be... zero-four-five. Range one-six-five-five-zero meters. Speed three knots, still slowing."

Volkova seated herself and put her hands together in an expression of deep thought. After a few moments, she roused herself again. "Battery Gangut, can you lead the target vessel by a kilometer without firing into the American side of the line? To make another warning shot?"

The girl who served as a telephone talker to Battery Gangut relayed the message. Twenty seconds later, she replied "Kapitan Dimitrova says the target ship is already too close to the international date line. We cannot fire any more shots across his bow without firing into the American sector."

"Very well," Volkova said. The only limitation she had been given was to avoid firing into the American sector - waters that, even though the Americans did not directly claim, were attributed to their control.

Before she could make a final decision, Leytenant Borisova spoke up. "Podpolkovnik, a radio intercept indicates an American ship is in the area; we are detecting their radio-location set. The range is still too long for positive radio-detection contact of our own, however."

"Probably one of the American coast guard vessels," Volkova said. "Coming to investigate... I think the Bear is in the region. We should probably inform them what's going on. In the meantime - Battery Gangut will prepare to fire further warning shots. Increase the range so we fire overhead the target vessel, not hitting under any circumstance. Await my command." She quickly scribbled out two different radio messages, and handed them to the waiting radio officer. "First message is to Senyavin; send in fleet code. Second message to Chinese vessel, open channel."

"Yes ma'am."

<Ostrov Ratmanova Central Command to Cruiser Senyavin: identify whether unknown vessel approaching from SE is American guardship. Once positively identified, advise them of situation. Provide periodic updates.>

<Ostrov Ratmanova Central Command to Chinese Warship: your presence represents an aggressive challenge to the security interests of the Russian Federation. Your government and your ship have received and ignored multiple warnings. If you attempt to pass this fortification, we will sink you. If you pass this fortification, our cruiser will sink you. If you evade our cruiser, our aircraft will sink you. Turn around immediately. No further warnings will be provided.>

"Battery Gangut, fire your warning shots," Volkova ordered. "Do not reload the guns until he shows us his intentions."

* * * * *


USCGC Bear, the Bering Strait
February 5th

Captain Edward H. Smith glassed the northwestern horizon and his ship Bear - the most modern icebreaker in American service - crunched her way through the sea ice toward the Bering Strait. Bear's deployment was unexpected: she'd been ordered to drop her expedition to assess seal and otter stocks in the Bering Sea, and dispatched only a day prior to make all speed to the strait, with no reasons given. However, only moments before, the community on Little Diomede Island had reported gunfire - quote - 'the Russians are shooting at a ship.'

Perhaps that might help us figure out what the big problem is... or perhaps not. Smith mentally reviewed everything he remembered about the area. Big Diomede Island lay on the Russian side of the strait, and the Ruskies - in the manner that they always did - had fortified it with old battleship guns. A lot of firepower, although Smith didn't remember all of the specifics. That didn't even take into account the maritime patrol aircraft on the island's air base.

"Radio message incoming," an ensign reported.

"Read it."

"Message says: "Russian cruiser 'Admiral Senyavin' to American ship bearing to our southeast. Please identify.' That's all."

"Send this response," Smith ordered. "'United States Coast Guard Cutter Bear responding to Russian cruiser Admiral Senyavin: we have received reports from Little Diomede Island of gunfire and have been ordered to investigate. Please advise at once. Over.'"

A few minutes went by before the Russian cruiser responded. "'Coast Defense batteries have fired warning shots on Chinese warship attempting to pass Bering Strait. 'Senyavin' and icebreaker are operating in area to assist in diverting Chinese incursion. Request your presence and assistance at once.'"

"Assistance?" Smith asked, dumbfounded. "What do they expect us to do?"

The Bear's XO frowned. "I'm more interested in this Chinese warship. What are the Chinese doing this far north?"

"No idea," Smith said. "But they obviously flipped off the Russians. You ever heard of them doing something like this, XO?"

"Never, sir." The XO considered. "Normally they're pretty friendly anytime I've been on a ship passing through to the Arctic. Didn't they garrison Big Diomede with a mostly female coast defense unit?"

"Think so," Smith said, vaguely remembering that the Russians did that. He thought it was a recipe for trouble, himself.

"Maybe," the XO said slyly, "it's just the wrong time in the month?"

"XO, you are a terrible person," Smith said with a weary sigh. "Another joke like that and I'll make sure you're assigned to count seals in Alaska."

"Already too late for that, sir," the XO grinned.

48

Monday, December 4th 2017, 2:31pm

onboard of HICMS Zhuhai

The ship was noticeably slowing down immediately after Captain Kun gave the order to stop. Battery Alpha of the ship was in the lowest position and pointing away from the Diomedes islands and on the deck of the Zhuhai were still scattered ice chunks, which had been thrown on deck by the warning shots of the Russians. There was a ghostly silence around the ship again.

"Ship Stops - still points toward 045°" Second Commander Yu Shan said shortly afterwards when the ship came to a standstill.

"The lunatics have actually shot on us." said Captain Kun, slightly excited. "Do the Russians want to start a war? The sea does not belong to them."

"Message to HQ: stopped at noticed position - expect more commands." Captain Kun continued. He could not do anything else at the moment, even if he wanted to kill the russian officer who ordered the shooting. Although his ship was equipped with 203mm guns and he also has 10 Harbin Ha-32 waterplanes on board, but any attack on the russian guns was nothing but suicide. Besides, his orders clearly showed how he had to act.

"Receive another open radio message from the russian battery" called a voice over the intercom from the radio room.

"Bring it immediately to me." Captain Kun said impatiently.

A short time later, the runner from the radio room appeared completely out of breath on the bridge. "Sir, here is the message from the russian battery." the seaman reported to Captain Kun.

"Give me that." Captain Kun answered harshly. With trembling fingers, Captain Kun held the message in his hands.

<Ostrov Ratmanova Central Command to Chinese Warship: your presence represents an aggressive challenge to the security interests of the Russian Federation. Your government and your ship have received and ignored multiple warnings. If you attempt to pass this fortification, we will sink you. If you pass this fortification, our cruiser will sink you. If you evade our cruiser, our aircraft will sink you. Turn around immediately. No further warnings will be provided.>

"What do they think who they are - the damned stupid russians. ", Captain Kun exclaimed loudly. "Do they believe, we let ourselves be intimidated. This crazy russian woman think she has the power to do what she want. We are not in russian territorial waters and even if we were, we still have the right of "transit passage" which they must not deny us. Did we finally get any answers and commands from our headquarter ?" Kun shouted more and more impatiently.

“No. Not now.” was the answer via intercom.

“What shall i do ?” Kun asked himself. The three words "<will sink you>" kept burning in his head. He leaned again over the nautical chart of the Bering Strait and repeatedly checked the position of his ship. But as often as he checked it, he was undoubtedly NOT in russian waters; although tight outside the 12-mile zone but outside. Then he made a decision for himself.

“Load Battery Alpha but don’t move turret !” he ordered via intercom. There was a confused silence on the bridge when the order came.

"Message from the HQ." a voice from the intercom broke the tense silence.

This time one of the radio operators personally comes to the bridge to deliver the message.

"HQ to Zhuhai. Continue course with 10kn east of Diomedes Islands. Aircraft for checking situation is on the way - planned refueling at catapult vessel "Dalingshan" of the Eurasia airline. Also send a radio message to russian battery, any further action (also further warning shots) are seen and interpreted as a warlike act and as violation of the neutrality agreement. Russian Ambassador has already been summoned to clarify the incident. Do not make any provocation on your part - repeat ABSOLUT NO PROVOCATION !

49

Monday, December 4th 2017, 3:33pm

Hmm.

Well, this is looking increasingly unlikely to end well for the Chinese...

50

Monday, December 4th 2017, 4:01pm

Hmm.

Well, this is looking increasingly unlikely to end well for the Chinese...


OOC: <Opens another bag of pop corn>

51

Monday, December 4th 2017, 6:12pm

Big Diomede Island
February 5th

"Target vessel appears to be getting underway again, ma'am," one of the women at the fire-control table reported.

Ariadne Volkova frowned and stared at the message the Chinese ship had just transmitted in reply. Unfortunately, the Chinese had found the one loophole that they could abuse: they were moving onto the American side of the strait, counting on the fact that the Russians would be reluctant to offer any insult, real or perceived, to the Americans.

"Can we still shoot the target before it crosses into the American side?" Volkova asked.

"No ma'am. They're still heading up the Bering Strait."

"Well, that's unfortunate," Volkova said, tossing down the copy of the Zhuhai's response. "New message to Senyavin - send in the clear so the target hears it. And the Americans. 'Fortress HQ to Senyavin. Intruding vessel refuses to turn around and is continuing up the Bering Strait in American territorial zone. Pursue and sink hostile vessel as soon as it leaves the American twelve-mile limit. Acknowledge!' Cut and send. Then telephone to Major Aleksandrov at the airfield. Tell him to ready his strike aircraft."

* * * * *


The Admiral Senyavin, the Bering Sea
February 5th

"Acknowledge receipt," Kapitan Grishin ordered. "Send order to Svyatogor: make best speed west of islands, then turn northeast'."

Svyatogor's captain expressed concern: the Chinese warship had three large guns and could seriously damage the Russian icebreaker; and without him, Senyavin could not push through the sea ice alone. Kapitan Grishin dismissed the icebreaker captain's concerns, although not without misgivings. "We'll need to finish this quickly to prevent any damage to the Svyatogor[/I]," he instructed the gunners. "Load and train the main battery."

* * * * *


USCGC Bear, the Bering Strait
February 5th

"Are they mad?" Captain Smith said as he got his first actual look at the situation. The Chinese ship - barely identifiable in the Arctic dawn as Zhuhai - was still heading north, now on the American side of the Bering Strait.

"The Russians, sir? Or the Chinese?" the Bear's XO likewise stared at the situation through the Bear's binoculars.

"The Chinese!" Smith said. "I understand what the Russians are doing, at least; they want to keep the Chinese out of the area, same as us. It's this Chinese captain who astounds me. The Russians massively outgun him, and yet their captain is not giving any concern whatsoever for the safety of his ship or crew. It's criminal."

"Do they think they're calling the Russian bluf?"

"I don't think the Russians are bluffing," Smith admitted. "They don't trust the Chinese - who does, these days? They're going to sink that poor Chinese idiot and then brazen out the political storm."

"I think you're right, sir."

Unfortunately, knowing what was about to happen didn't mean Smith could stop it, although he had good intentions.

"Send a radio message to the Zhuhai," Smith ordered, writing it down hastily. <USCGC Bear to Chinese ship Zhuhai. If you continue on your current course you place your ship in peril. Please turn around at once to avoid international incident. If you turn around we will escort you clear.>

The [I]Bear
's XO nodded in thought. "What position do we need to take here, sir?"

"We don't want the Chinese poking their noses up here," Smith said. "We agree with the Russians on that, at least. But they've clearly got orders to do something about it, unlike us. I dare say the State Department would prefer me to do everything I can to avoid a war starting... but I fear the best service we'll be able to do is help the Russians recover survivors while the State Department lodges a complaint with one side or another."