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41

Monday, July 7th 2014, 7:04pm

Well, good looking for Ugly Aircraft Inc.!!

Eyup, you've still got that Ugly Aircraft Magic Touch. ;)

42

Saturday, July 12th 2014, 4:12pm

A couple of new drawings of Kirk's Fokker D.XIX series


Fokker D.XIXC


Fokker D.XIXD

43

Saturday, July 12th 2014, 4:42pm

Looks approximately MS.406-ish, I think. A nice cute little fighter. :)

44

Saturday, July 19th 2014, 2:30pm

More drawings, this time of the Fokker D.XXV. A blend of Avia and Fokker and Focke Wulf styling with a hint of La-5/ Soviet engine-mounted cannon layout.


45

Sunday, July 20th 2014, 2:46pm

Looks pretty cool. It'd almost be worth drawing it in a larger size so you could admire the details. :)

One question. I thought the Dutch didn't use that Czech-inspired "Pie Graph" roundel until a bit more recently, and only used the orange triangle in this era. Am I mistaken in that?

46

Sunday, July 20th 2014, 5:09pm

Good question Brock. It seems the roundel was in use pre-war for the Dutch aircraft, but the orange triangle was the standard marking of the Dutch East Indies Army aircraft along with orange rudders. Both were entirely separate arms. In Wesworld the orange triangle on its side marks a squadron leaders aircraft and the roundel is standard (indeed all aerial forces are part of a unified Royal Netherlands Air Force).


More drawings! This time the Fokker G.1 series


G-1A2


G-1C2


G-1B

47

Saturday, July 26th 2014, 5:30pm

Two more aircraft of the G-1 series:


Fokker G-2 photo-reconnaissance


Fokker G-2C ground-attack

48

Sunday, August 3rd 2014, 4:40pm

More pictures!




The Fokker G-3 and G-3A nightfighters.

49

Sunday, August 10th 2014, 12:34pm

Jet Aircraft

My first draft impressions on the first jet-propelled aircraft of the Netherlands. I'm open to opinions and suggestions. They use SAE jet data from Hoo and are roughly contemporary with real world designs and are based firmly on existing airframe technology. The in-service dates might be slightly optimistic but service entry would most likely be to training units etc. and deliveries are dependant on supplies from SAE.


Fokker D.XXIIIS
An experimental jet-powered variant based on a standard D.XXIIIE airframe. The engine was obtained from the SAE, a VB.03/ Rayton Swazi rated at 3,000lbs thrust. This was mounted in the rear fuselage with two lateral intakes in the inner wing roots. Both piston engines were removed and a new streamlined nosecone fitted. The tailbooms were strengthened and the tailplane moved to the tips of the tailfins to clear the exhaust. A pressurised cockpit was fitted too. The second D.XXIIIE prototype was rebuilt from December 1944 and made its first flight with a pre-production VB.03 engine rated at 2,800lbs on 17 May 1945. It was re-engined with an early production Rayton Swazi engine in December. Flight testing continued until August 1946.
Length: 10.56 m (34 ft 6 in)
Span: 11.88 m (39 ft 0 in)
Wing Area: 303 ft2
Wingloading: 37.9 lb/ft2
Empty Weight: 3526 kg (7,773 lb)
Maximum Weight: 5500 kg (12,125 lb)
Powerplant: 1x 2,800lb Rayton VB.03 or 3,000lb Rayton Swazi centrifugal turbojet engine
Maximum Speed: 843 km/h (524mph)
Service ceiling: 12450 m (41,000 ft)
Rate of climb: 19.7 m/sec (3,877 ft/min)
Range: 917 km (570 miles)
Armament: none

Fokker D.XXVIII
During 1945, based on experiences with the experimental D.XXIIIS, Fokker began designing a new purpose-designed jet-powered fighter for the Royal Netherlands Air Force. In overall layout it resembled the British de Havilland Vampire and was powered by a 3,000lb Rayton Swazi centrifugal turbojet engine. The first of six prototypes first flew on 14 August 1946 and the pre-production batch was built during mid-1947 before production began of the definitive version with a pressurised cockpit equipped with a Danish ejector seat. 250 were ordered in early 1946.
Length: 9.41m (30 ft 9 in)
Wingspan: 11.60 m (38 ft 0.5in)
Height: 2.69 m (8 ft 10 in)
Wing area: 24.34 m² (262 ft²)
Empty weight: 3,605 kg (7,947 lb)
Maximum take-off weight: 5,650 kg (12,456 lb)
Powerplant: 1x 3,000lb Rayton Swazi centrifugal turbojet engine
Maximum speed: 862 km/h (536 mph)
Service ceiling: 13,045 m (42,800 ft)
Rate of climb: 23.6 m/s (4,645 ft/min)
Range: 1920 km (1,193 miles)
Armament: 4× 23mm GAST cannon in lower fuselage, 8x 75mm rocket projectiles or 2x 250kg bombs or 545 litre droptanks underwing
Armour: 10mm bulkheads ahead and behind cockpit

Koolhoven F.K.62
As the Royal Netherlands Air Force began looking at jet-powered fighters, it also saw the need to experiment with high-speed jet-powered fast bombers. Koolhoven took their F.K. 61 and simply removed the piston engines and fitted two 3,000lb Rayton Swazi centrifugal turbojets in revised nacelles. A production airframe was converted in September 1945 and made its first flight on 29 December as the F.K.61S. A series of eight pre-production aircraft designated F.K.62 followed from February 1946. These differed in having a new tail unit with more dihedral on the tailplanes and more streamlined nose. The new main undercarriage retracted into the inner wingroots. The two crewmen were seated on Danish ejector seats, the navigator/ bomb-aimer sitting in the nose. Production of 135 F.K.62s began in September 1946. 36 were completed as F.K.62R high-altitude reconnaissance aircraft with five cameras fitted in the former bomb bay.
Wingspan: 21.34 m (80 ft 0 in)
Length: 15.03 m (49 ft 3 in)
Height: 5.73 m (18 ft 8 in)
Wing area: 66.03 m2 (710 ft2)
Gross weight: 15043 kg (33,164 lb)
Max take-off weight: 17250 kg (38,030 lb)
Powerplant: 2x 3,000lb Rayton Swazi centrifugal turbojet engines
Maximum speed: 716 km/h (445 mph) at 12192 m (40,000 ft)
Service ceiling: 13106 m (43,000 ft)
Range: 2414 km (1,500 miles) internal fuel
Armament: 2000kg (4,409 lb) of bombs in an internal bomb bay and 1000 kg (2,204 lb) externally or 12x 75mm rocket projectiles underwing

50

Sunday, August 10th 2014, 2:16pm

First impressions:

The D.XXIIIS looks rather like the OTL Saab J21R, so taking that as an exemplar, I find that the D.XXIIIS is heavier by half a ton, has slightly less engine power, yet is a tad faster, with superior ceiling and a somewhat greater range. Perhaps some minor adjustment to performance to bring it in line with the J21R would be worth considering. Beyond that, the concept appears reasonable.

The D.XXVIII's stats look reasonable enough, but I really have to wonder if the development cycle of proposed for it allows for sufficient experience with the D.XXIIIS to know what is necessary. As to the design, looks good to me.

The F.K.62 is problematic for me, if only because I have doubts about the viability of taking an airframe designed for piston engines (and piston speeds) and merely slapping a couple of jet engines on it. The Russians tried that with a number of designs and the results were of doubtful utility (the Tupolev Tu-12 comes to mind). I won't say it cannot be done, but I'd like to know more about the design history.

51

Sunday, August 10th 2014, 3:49pm

Yes, the XXIIIS is based on the OTL Saab J21R in spirit though I didn't actually look at the specs when I wrote this! So I'm glad I got close. I'll edit the range and ceiling.

The XXVIII is basically a Vampire rip-off but in all-metal. I agree the timings are close. The problem is the Netherlands can see Britain and Germany and now France with operational jets and newer models in development. SAE jet tech is perhaps slightly behind the curve and this design will morph into a DH Venom clone by 1950, by which time it'll make a fine fighter. There is urgency to get a jet fighter and so development is on priority. Also, I'm not sure how much the XXIIIS will contribute, most piston conversions in OTL only proved they were bad idea and I'd like to think having built the excellent basic D.XXIII series that Fokker has the aerodynamic know-how to develop the Vampire-esque airframe. Jets pose problems but SAE testbeds are airborne now and one hopes some design data comes with those engines. However, I might push the dates back ~6 months.

The F.K.61 is based on the never-built DH.102 'Super Mosquito'. When the DH.102 was designed there were brief sketch plans for a jet powered version. No specs have ever been found, only the plan. So my design takes that other approach and brings it to life, specs are a mash-up of Ar 234 and reduced Canberra/ early Westland design version before Petter moved to EE.
Early jet bombers generally are tricky, they were either; a) small twin-engine types with limited payload and range, b) four engine small mediums (B-45), c) big multi engine. I don't think of the first generation jet bombers were any good, the second gen Canberra and Il-28 were good but needed 6,000lb+ engines to work well. So the FK.62 is basically an early attempt to increase bomber speed and is a compromise. It'll work but it won't be great, I might degrade the specs a little more. Perhaps in 1950 Koolhoven will work on a proper Canberra clone?

52

Sunday, August 10th 2014, 4:03pm

I agree with you whole-heartedly on the question of first-generation jet bombers - the designs that emerged were either very light on their ordnance loads or were rather klunky agglomerations of engine nacelles. Even some of the more aerodynamic "paper napkin" designs you'll find at Luftwaffe '46 have engines hung on some very odd places, or they are limited to 1,000 kg for 1,000 km. The problem is engines.

I've deliberately slowed the development of the BMW003 engine though it will begin to make its appearance in late 45/early 46 - starting at about 3,000 pounds of thrust and scaling up from there rather quickly - the basic design has a lot of development potential. At some point I may release some "sketch designs" of things the airframe manufacturers are proposing but it will be 1947-48 before any metal - if any at all - would be cut on them.

It would be helpful to gauge Dutch jet developments against those in the SAE, where the engine technology seems to be originating. However... ;(

53

Sunday, January 22nd 2017, 2:28pm

New stuff for 1948:


KOOPD X-01 Sikumbang
A single-seat low-wing monoplane of mixed construction of conventional configuration. It has a fixed tricycle undercarriage and the pilot is seated under a bubble canopy. The prototype made its maiden flight on 11 July 1947 and production began during 1948. The prototype was powered by a 190hp Walter Major 6 engine, but production aircraft received a more powerful Argus 410.
The all-metal construction X-02 variant is now in design.
Wingspan: 10.61 m (34 ft 10 in)
Length: 8.16 m (26 ft 9 in)
Height: 3.35 m (11 ft 0 in)
Wing area: 16.9 m2 (182 sq ft)
Empty weight: 795 kg (1,753 lb)
Gross weight: 1,090 kg (2,403 lb)
Fuel capacity: 205 Litres (45 imp gal)
Powerplant: 1x 240hp Argus As410
Maximum speed: 276 km/h (171 mph)
Cruising speed: 244 km/h (151 mph)
Range: 960 km (597 miles)
Service ceiling: 5,100 m (16,730 ft)
Rate of climb: 5.6 m/s (1,100 ft/min)
Armament: 2x 13.2mm FN-Browning machine guns in the wings, four bomb racks for 2x 150kg or 4x 50kg bombs or 4x rockets underwing


KOOPD X-03 Belalang
A basic trainer with a low monoplane wing and of mixed construction. The undercarriage is fixed and the pupil and instructor sit in tandem. The prototype first flew on 28 February 1948 and production of the Belalang 90 began in December.
Wingspan: 9.50 m (31 ft 1 in)
Length: 7.70 m (25 ft 3½ in)
Height: 2.03 m (6 ft 8 in)
Wing area: 15.0 m² (161.5 sq ft)
Empty weight: 230 kg (506 lb)
Maximum take-off weight: 330 kg (726 lb)
Powerplant: 90hp Continental C-90-12F air-cooled flat-four
Cruise speed: 130 km/h (80 mph)
Range: 564 km (350 miles)
Service ceiling: 3,700 m (12,000 ft)
Rate of climb: 2.3 m/s (460 ft/min)

Fokker S.XV
A development of the S.XI Instructor first flown in May 1948 powered by a 260hp Minerva-Avia Minion Minor piston engine with a maximum speed of 265 km/h (164 mph). First deliveries were made in December 1948.

Koolhoven F.K.62
As the Royal Netherlands Air Force began looking at jet-powered fighters, it also saw the need to experiment with high-speed jet-powered fast bombers. Koolhoven took their F.K. 61 and simply removed the piston engines and fitted two 3,000lb Rayton Swazi centrifugal turbojets in revised nacelles. A production airframe was converted in September 1945 and made its first flight on 29 December 1946 as the F.K.61S. A series of eight pre-production aircraft designated F.K.62 followed from February 1947. These differed in having a new tail unit with more dihedral on the tailplanes and more streamlined nose. The new main undercarriage retracted into the inner wingroots. The two crewmen were seated on Danish ejector seats, the navigator/ bomb-aimer sitting in the nose. Production aircraft were powered by two 4,200lb VB.04 Stuart Zulu centrifugal turbojets. Production of 135 F.K.62s began in January 1948. 36 were completed as F.K.62R high-altitude reconnaissance aircraft with five cameras fitted in the former bomb bay.
Wingspan: 21.34 m (80 ft 0 in)
Length: 15.03 m (49 ft 3 in)
Height: 5.73 m (18 ft 8 in)
Wing area: 66.03 m2 (710 ft2)
Gross weight: 15,043 kg (33,164 lb)
Max take-off weight: 17,250 kg (38,030 lb)
Powerplant: 2x 4,200lb VB.04 Stuart Zulu centrifugal turbojet engines
Maximum speed: 716 km/h (445 mph) at 12192 m (40,000 ft)
Service ceiling: 13106 m (43,000 ft)
Range: 1610 km (1,000 miles) internal fuel
Armament: 2000kg (4,409 lb) of bombs in an internal bomb bay and 1000 kg (2,204 lb) externally or 12x 75mm rocket projectiles underwing


Stichting voor de Ontwikkeling en Bouw van een Experimenteel Hefschroefvliegtuig (Foundation for the Development and Construction of an Experimental Helicopter (SOBEH)
Founded in August 1948 to foster research and development of Dutch helicopters. This initiative was launched with the support of the NLL, NIV and RSL.

Nurtanio Wiweko Glider N.V.
Founded in May 1946 by Wiweko Soepono, Nurtanio Pringgoadisurjo, and J. Sumarsono in a workshop in Magetan, near Madiun, DEI. The company designs and builds gliders.
Currently in Production:
Zögling
NWG-1
In Development:
WEL-X – motorised glider with a Harley Davidson engine, first flown in March 1948