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1

Thursday, October 28th 2010, 7:53pm

Armoured Vehicles of the Heer

Placeholder for technical data regarding armoured vehicles employed by the Deutsche Heer

2

Friday, October 29th 2010, 6:52pm

leichte Feldhaubitze 18 auf Fahrgestell Panzerkampfwagen II “Wespe”

(“Wasp” 105mm Self-propelled Howitzer)

The Wespe (Wasp) self-propelled howitzer was first unveiled late in 1937, during a demonstration of prototype equipment at the Grafenwohr training area. While considered imperfect – the chassis and superstructure were thought barely sufficient to contain the weapon – the Wespe did offer mobility superior to towed artillery in support of Panzer formations. Thorough tests were conducted and, early in 1938, the Altmärkische Kettenfabrik GmbH of Madgeburg was directed to begin production of the vehicle. The first vehicles from Alkett emerged in April 1938, and were followed in July of 1938 by additional units from the Mühlenbau und Industrie AG. The type equips light howitzer batteries of the Panzer Divisions, and, as deliveries permit, it is expected that vehicles of this type will be delivered to the light howitzer batteries of the motorised infantry divisions.

108 vehicles of this type were delivered in 1938, and a further 312 in 1939; production is continuing at the present time



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Friday, October 29th 2010, 6:54pm

leichte Panzerspähwagen Typ Sonderkraftfahrzeug 222

(Type 222 Light Armoured Reconnaissance Vehicle)

The Type 222 Light Armoured Reconnaissance Vehicle was designed in 1935 in response to Heer requirements for a small but well armed vehicle to equip the Aufklärungs-Abteilungen of its Panzer and motorised infantry divisions. It was small, compact, and relatively quiet, and proved quite useful in Heer maneuvers during the late 1930s. Featuring a heavier armament than the Type 221 Armoured Scout Car it came to be the preferred vehicle of the Heer, and in 1940 is was decided to standardise on this type in preference to the larger armoured cars of the Type 231 series.

Production was undertaken by the Eisenwerke Weserhutte of Bad Oeynhausen and by Maschinenfabrik Niedersachsen of Hannover-Linden. Automotive components were supplied by the Horch Division of Auto-Union, Zwickau. By the close of December 1939 a total of 1,080 vehicles of this type had been delivered to the Heer and production was continuing at an accelerated pace.



4

Saturday, October 30th 2010, 8:47pm

schwere geländegängige gepanzerte Personenkraftwagen

(Heavy Cross-Country Armoured Personnel Car)

The Type 247 Heavy Cross-Country Armoured Personnel Car was designed in 1935 in response to Heer requirements for a cross country armoured support vehicle to equip the Aufklärungs-Abteilungen of its Panzer and motorised infantry divisions. Production was undertaken by the Eisenwerke Weserhutte of Bad Oeynhausen and by Maschinenfabrik Niedersachsen of Hannover-Linden. Automotive components were supplied by the Horch Division of Auto-Union, Zwickau. By the close of December 1939 a total of 320 vehicles of this type had been delivered to the Heer and production was continuing at an accelerated pace.



5

Tuesday, November 2nd 2010, 10:13pm

Panzerfeldhaubitze 37 auf Geschützwagen III/IV “Hummel”

(“Bumblebee” 150 mm Self-propelled Howitzer)

The Hummel (Bumblebee) self propelled howitzer followed the lighter Wespe in the spring of 1938, intended to equip the heavy howitzer batteries of the Panzer Divisions. Based upon the chassis of the larger Panzer III/IV, the vehicle was better able to contain the heavy howitzer and it was considered to exhibit better cross-country mobility compared with the lighter Wespe. Following thorough tests it was decided to standardise the vehicle and the firm of Alfred Becker AG of Bielefeld was instructed to begin conversion of redundant Panzer III/IV chassis to provide an interim quantity of vehicles. This was followed in 1939 by orders to Waggonfabrik Gottfried Lindner AG of Ammendorf-Halle to provide a second source of conversions pending identification of a primary production source.

12 vehicles of this type were delivered in 1938, and a further 108 in 1939; conversion of available chassis is continuing at the present time and it is expected that new production vehicles will emerge during 1940.



6

Wednesday, November 3rd 2010, 1:17pm

Sturmgeschütz III (Sonderkraftfahrzeug 142)

(Assault Gun III – Type 142)

The first examples of the Assault Gun III appeared in 1937, and were built in a small series, intended to provide direct fire support to advancing infantry. The type fell victim to economy measures and in 1938 production was suspended in favor of increased tank production. Developmental efforts continued under the direction of Oberst Erich von Manstein and a revised design was reinstated in production in mid-1939. By the close of 1939 a total of 210 examples of the new series had been delivered to the Heer, and production was continuing at an accelerating pace.



7

Thursday, November 4th 2010, 8:04pm

Panzerkampfwagen IV Ausführung F (Sonderkraftfahrzeug 161)

(Medium Tank Mark IV Model F)

The prototype of the Mark IV Model F Medium Tank appeared early in 1938, and the type entered production later that year. The long-barreled 7.5cm KwK38 gun is expected to enable the vehicle to meet potential opponents on an equal basis for the foreseeable future. It is expected that this model of the Medium Tank Mark IV will become the standard tank of the Heer’s panzer divisions.

The vehicle was developed and first produced at Friedrich Krupp-Grusonwerke AG, Magdeburg-Buckau. However, during the course of 1939, production facilities were established at the Vogtlandische Maschinenfabrik AG, Plauen and at the Eisenwerke Oberdonau AG, Linz. By the close of December 1939 a total of 463 vehicles of this particular model had been delivered to the Heer and production was continuing at an accelerated rate.



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Thursday, November 4th 2010, 11:24pm

Panzerkampfwagen II Ausführung F (Sonderkraftfahrzeug 121)

(Light Tank Mark II Model F)

The final gun tank of the Light Tank Mark II series, the Light Tank Mark II Model F first appeared in 1938, entering large-scale production to meet the immediate needs of the Heer. It derived many of its features from the export variants of the Light Tank Mark II design developed over the preceding years. However, as a gun tank, the design had been overtaken by later designs and it was considered suitable for employment only in the reconnaissance units of panzer and motorised infantry divisions. Its chassis, however, was widely adapted for a variety of self-propelled artillery weapons.

Four firms were engaged in production of the Light Tank Mark II F – the lead firm being Maschinenfabrik Augsburg-Nürnberg GmbH, Nürnberg. The follower firms were Altmärkische Kettenwerke GmbH, Werk II, Berlin-Tegel, Fahrzeug- und Motoren-Werke GmbH, Breslau and Waggonfabrik Wegmann AG, Kassel. The design went out of production in November 1939 following completion of 524 units.



9

Saturday, December 4th 2010, 12:30am

15 cm schweres Infanterie Geschütz 33 auf Selbstfahrlafette II “Bison”

(“Bison” 150mm Self-propelled Gun)


The “Bison” 150mm Self-propelled Gun was developed in the middle 1930s to meet Heer requirements for a mobile mount for the 150mm heavy infantry gun. Engineers at the Altmärkische Kettenwerk, Berlin-Spandau, responded with a vehicle based upon the proven Panzerkampfwagen II, but lengthened by the addition of a sixth road-wheel on each side of the chassis. Evaluation of two prototypes in 1935 led to a production contract of the type, which is intended to equip the heavy infantry gun platoons of rifle regiments in the panzer divisions, and, as weapons become available, the heavy infantry gun platoons in the regiments of motorised infantry divisions.

More than two hundred vehicles of this type have been delivered to the Heer prior to 31 December 1939, and production was continuing.



10

Tuesday, May 3rd 2011, 8:32pm

7,5cm Panzerabwehrkanone 40 auf Selbstfahrlafette II “Marder”

(“Marten” 75mm Self-propelled AntitankGun)

The prototypes of this weapon were tested late in 1940 and, while not without drawbacks, the weapon was put into production early in 1941 to become a mobile anti-tank gun for Panzergrenadier units of the Heer. Altmärkische Kettenfabrik and Mühlenbau und Industrie will undertake manufacture of the vehicle using cannon supplied by Krupp. A delivery of the first vehicles of this type is expected for February 1941.


11

Monday, May 27th 2013, 9:39pm

Standardpanzer I "Panther"

Standardpanzer I “Panther”




Technical Specifications

Weight: 45.5 tonnes (combat loaded)
Length: 8.65 meters
Height: 2.97 meters
Width: 3.43 meters
Engine: Junkers 230 P30 water-cooled V-12 diesel, 850 hp at 2800 rpm
Main Gun: 8.8cm KwK 42 L/71 (72 rounds)
Secondary Weapons: 1x 7.92mm MG 34 (Coaxial – 2100 rounds), 1x 7.92mm MG 34 (Bow – 2400 rounds), 1x 7.92mm MG 34 (AA – 2400 rounds), 92mm Smoke Grenade Launcher
Hull Armor: 80mm (max), 20mm (min)
Turret Armor: 100mm (max), 20mm (min)
Road Speed: 46 Kph
Rough Speed: 30 Kph
Road Range: 380 Kilometers
Off-Road Range: 150 Kilometers

12

Wednesday, March 19th 2014, 12:13am

Jagdpanzer IV “Jaguar”

Combat Weight: 25,800 kg
Length: 8,500 mm
Width: 3,170 mm
Height: 1,850 mm

Crew: 4

Armor: 80 mm (max. front), 10 mm (min.)

Main Armament: 7.5cm KwK42 L/70 with 55 rounds
Secondary Armament: 7.92mm MG34 with 600 rounds

Engine: Maybach HL 120 TRM rated at 296 hp
Power/weight: 11.47 hp/tonne
Suspension: Leaf spring
Operational Range: 210 km

Developed by the Vogtländische Maschinenfabrik AG of Plauen as a heavy antitank vehicle on the chassis of the Panzerkampfwagen IV. Allocated to antitank battalions of panzer and panzergrenadier divisions.

13

Wednesday, March 19th 2014, 2:03pm

Brückenlegepanzer "Biber"



Developed by the Vogtlandische Maschinenfabrik AG, Plauen, on the chassis of the Panzerkampfwagen IV to meet Heer requirements for an armoured vehicle launched bridge. Entered service in mid-1943 with limited production continuing at VOMAG and MIAG Braunschweig.

14

Wednesday, March 19th 2014, 5:10pm

Flugabwehrkanonenpanzer "Wirbelwind"



Specialist antiaircraft vehicle constructed on the chassis of the Panzerkampfwagen IV to meet Heer requirements for a mobile antiaircraft weapon for panzer formations. Development and production undertaken by Vogtlandische Maschinenfabrik AG, Plauen, with the Waggon-und Maschinenbau AG, Görlitz as a second production source.

15

Monday, December 28th 2015, 11:22pm

Aufklärungspanzer Luchs

Combat weight: 8,400 kg
Length: 4.47 metres
Width: 2.34 metres
Height: 2.02 metres (without antenna)
Suspension: Torsion bar, with five road wheels, three return rollers
Armour: Hull forward: 20 mm at 62°; Hull other: 10 mm; Turret: 15 mm
Engine: Deutz 6-cylinder diesel, 165 hp, located at front
Speed: 55 kph (forward), 25 kph (reverse)
Operational radius: 390 kilometres (road)
Fuel capacity: 390 litres
Fording depth: 0.7 metres
Maximum step: 0.60 metres
Trench crossing ability: 1.50 metres

Crew: Varies according to role. Normal reconnaissance variant has a crew of five – commander in the turret, driver, radio operator, and two scouts

Armament: 20mm automatic cannon (MG151/20 L/55) in the turret with 500 rounds of ammunition. Personal weapons include pistol (commander), two machine pistols (driver and radio operator) and two rifles (scouts)


Development

In late 1943 the Heer formulated staff requirements for a fully-tracked light armoured vehicle to replace its SdKfz 222 series of light armoured cars and certain SdKfz 251 series half-track vehicles employed in reconnaissance roles. Following submissions by industry the design proposed Altmärkische Kettenwerke of Berlin-Borsigwalde was selected for further development and testing. The first pre-production vehicles were delivered late in the autumn of 1944 and were followed by the first production vehicles in January 1945.

Known as the Aufklärungspanzer Luchs (Reconnaissance Tank Lynx) the first vehicles were delivered to the troops in the late winter of 1945, and production was built up rapidly to meet the requirement of the Heer. The basic chassis has been adapted for a variety of specialist roles, including:

Beobachtungspanzer “Waschbär” – an armoured observation post for the artillery; fitted with additional telescopes, a rangefinder, and additional radio equipment

Mörserträger “Iltis” – an armoured carried for the 81mm trench mortar, used to support reconnaissance units with smoke and suppressive fire for disengagement

Sanitätspanzer “Hermelin” – an armoured ambulance employed in relatively small numbers; unarmed and fitted to transport up to two stretcher cases

Alkett has proposed the design of a dedicated munitions and supply vehicle on the Luchs chassis; to date this variant has not been adopted by the Heer.

The Ejército de Chile has acquired a quantity of one hundred Luchs vehicles as the M46 “Lince” for use by its armoured cavalry regiments.

Altogether no fewer than five factories are engaged in the production of the type, including Alkett’s works at Berlin-Borsigwalde and Berlin-Tegel, the Weserhütte at Bad Oeynhausen, Mechanische Werke Cottbus, and Büssing-NAG at Berlin-Oberschöneweide. Production is presently in excess of two hundred vehicles per month.


16

Friday, July 22nd 2016, 9:40pm

Sturmhaubitze Braunbär



In 1947 a decision was made to upgrade the Heer’s existing inventory of Sturmgeschütz III infantry support vehicles by replacement of the short-barreled 7.5cm KwK 40 with the 10.5cm Sturmhaubitze 46, a derivative of the well-tested 10.5cm leFH 18. The decision was based upon the need for vehicle capable of delivering both direct and indirect fire, which would supplant the towed 7.5cm and 15cm infantry guns still serving in the Heer’s infantry formations. The StuH46 was also capable of firing projectiles of the new
“Quetschkopf” type, which offered greater power for attacking static defence positions and fortified bunkers.

The work of upgrading existing vehicles was assigned to several factories and Heer depots under the oversight of Mühlenbau und Industrie AG of Braunschweig.

General Data

Crew: 4
Weight: 23,000 kg
Length: 6.14 metres
Width: 2.96 metres
Height: 2.15 metres
Armour: 80-19 millimetres
Engine: Maybach HL 120 TRM V-12 300 hp petrol engine driving six-speed transmission

Armament

Main: 10.5cm StuH 46 (48 rounds)
Secondary: 7.92mm MG42 (600 rounds)

Performance

Power/weight ratio: 12.6 hp/tonne
Operational range: 155 kilometres
Road speed: 40 kph

17

Saturday, August 6th 2016, 11:48pm

Schützenpanzer Buffel

Combat weight: 14,600 kg
Length: 5.76 metres
Width: 2.54 metres
Height: 2.15 metres
Suspension: Torsion bar, with five road wheels, three return rollers
Armour: Hull forward: 25 mm at 45°; Hull other: 10 mm; Turret: 15 mm
Engine: Deutz 6-cylinder diesel, 225 hp, located at front
Speed: 58 kph (road)
Operational radius: 270 kilometres (road)
Fording depth: 0.7 metres
Maximum step: 0.60 metres
Trench crossing ability: 1.50 metres

Crew: Standard infantry carrier has a crew of two and six infantry.

Armament: 20mm automatic cannon (MG151/20 L/55) in the turret with 400 rounds of ammunition.

Development

Following the success of the Aufklärungspanzer Luchs the Army Armaments Office instructed the Altmärkische Kettenwerke to proceed with the design of a full tracked infantry carrier to replace, in part, the Heer’s existing inventory of semi-track infantry carriers of the SdKfz 251 series. The contract for this work was awarded in January 1946. Trials vehicles were delivered in the autumn of 1946 with the first pre-production vehicles delivered in January 1947.

Three factories are presently engaged in the manufacture of the vehicle – the Alkett - Berlin-Borsigwalde works, the Alkett - Berlin-Tegel works, and the factory of Waggonfabrik Wegmann AG. Studies have been undertaken for development of mortar carrier and command variants, but none have been fielded to date.

18

Saturday, October 29th 2016, 10:53pm

Leichtepanzer "Lowe"



Weight: 18,250 kg
Length: 5.03 metres (excluding gun)
Width: 2.9 metres
Height: 2.77 metres
Crew: 4
Engine: Maybach 12-cylinder petrol, 380 hp
Speed: 60 kph (road), 33 kph (cross-country)
Power/weight ratio: 20.8
Suspension: Modified Christie with torsion bars
Fuel Capacity: 450 litres
Fuel Consumption: 35 km/100 litres

Armament: 8cm KwK46 with 64 rounds of ammunition; coaxial 7.92mm MG34 with 1,800 rounds of ammunition

Armour:

Hull Front (Upper): 47 mm
Hull Front (Lower): 47 mm
Hull Sides (Upper): 25 mm
Hull Sides (Lower): 15 mm
Hull Rear: 15 mm
Hull Top: 10 mm
Hull Bottom: 10 mm
Turret Front: 47 mm
Turret Mantlet: 57 mm
Turret Sides: 25 mm
Turret Rear: 25 mm
Turret Top: 10 mm