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Tuesday, November 22nd 2011, 11:23pm

Peru, 1941

Peruvian News, 1941

Elections

The first set of public elections since the 1937 Civil War took place in July 1941.

The Presidency was won by Luis Galvez, an industrialist from Lima. He defeated Sr. Kaime Carderos by a margin of 57.4% to 42.6%.

The Congressional elections provided some surprises. The Congressionalist Party, led by Prime Minister Orlando Bayon, shed a number of seats in urban areas, though it secured a sizeable minority of seats overall. The National Restoration Party, an offshoot of the former Social Democrats led by Alberto Hernandez, took the second-most seats, and is expected to be in opposition to the Congressionalists. Peru First, Peruvian Worker's Federation, Marxist Party, and the Progressive Party also secured seats, as did three independent candidates well-known in their constituencies.

Quoted

Congress, July 1941

Congressionalist: 46
National Restoration: 30
Peru First: 19
Peruvian Workers: 12
Marxist: 5
Progressive: 5
Independent: 3


Not surprisingly, President Galvez invited Sr. Bayon to become Prime Minister and form a government. Sr. Bayon agreed, and began negotiations with the other parties within days. He was not able to secure an outright majority coalition; National Restoration was not prepared to align itself under any circumstances, and Peruvian workers, while not actively seeking to immediately bring down the government, acknowledged that they simply were not ideologically compatible. The Marxists declined to engage in discussions at all.

Sr. Bayon finally managed to secure the active support of the Progressives and two Independents (the latter both consenting in exchange for cabinet positions). Peru First agreed to support the Congressionalists on economic and social issues, but warned that its consent to foreign and defence-related matters would depend on compatibility with its pro-isolationist stance.

This gave Bayon 53 of 120 seats as a base, with the potential for another 19 where Peru First was prepared to back the coalition.


Congressional Address

Prime Minister Bayon articulated his government's priorities in a speech to Congress in early August. The stated priorities of his government were to be:

1. Re-establishing and strengthening relations with Peru's long-time allies, Iberia and Italy being specifically named.

2. Strengthening relations with long-time trading partners, Germany and South Africa being specifically named.

3. A new economic plan to capitalize on now-completed post-war economic and infrastructure reconstruction efforts.

4. Continued reconstruction and modernization of the Peruvian military, with a priority set upon self-defence and deterrence.

5. Continued efforts to reduce corruption in government and Peruvian society in general, post-war efforts having not wholly solved the issue.


Defence Procurement

The Peruvian Air Force and Army put out a range of tenders for aircraft and arms to traditionally friendly states (AEGIS, Germany, South Africa, Bharat)

(OOC: And no, I'm not getting into those details at all)

The Peruvian Navy laid down a variety of small craft with specific defensive roles, as well as a new light cruiser built along German lines.

Design work was reported to be underway in respect of new destroyer and anti-aircraft cruisers.

Requests for proposals were held in regards to the potential purchase of an aircraft carrier and associated equipment. Final decisions were not available at press time.

The Peruvian Navy was directed to engage in a lessons-learned exercise related to the Civil War naval actions, and a strategic plan for construction over the next five years.

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Wednesday, November 23rd 2011, 11:59am

OOC: Great to see news coming out of Peru after such a long hiatus. Looking forward to more.

IC: The German Government recognises the progress made by Peru in its national reconstruction, evidenced by its commitment to the democratic process. Germany welcomes the normalisation of trade relations, and will send a delegation of officials from the Ministry of Economics and members of Reichsverband Deutschen Industrie to Lima to open direct talks with the responsible Peruvian authorities to respond to Peru's needs and expectations.

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Wednesday, November 23rd 2011, 2:17pm

News from my neighbor, huzzah!

Chile's ambassador in Lima will tender his congratulations to Senor Galvez and Prime Minister Baylon. The ambassor will present a ceremonial machete inscribed with the phrase ordo ab chao, and will attend Presidente Galvez's inauguration if possible.

The French, Irish, and Bulgarian governments send their congratulations via the appropriate channels. (Don't think the Irish and the Bulgarians currently have embassies in Lima; they'll give the nod via the League's HQ in Switzerland.)

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Saturday, November 26th 2011, 3:39pm

The Argentine governemnt also send their congratulations to President Luis Galvez and Prime Minister Baylon.
They wait to see what the new government can offer, relations have been strained in previous years and the Argentines still can't work out why the Peruvians are still so willing to be lackeys to their former Imperial Masters.

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Sunday, December 4th 2011, 4:30am

ARMADA PURCHASES AIRCRAFT CARRIER

August 18, 1941 - Callao

The Armada announced today that it has entered into an agreement with the Government of Italy to purchase the light aircraft carrier Caboto.

A spokesman for the Armada noted, "We received several solicitations in response to an expression of interest in an aircraft carrier. After careful consideration, we felt that the Caboto best suited the Armada's requirements."

The Caboto was built a decade ago to serve as a training carrier under the rules of the Cleito Naval Treaty. The Armada confirmed that Italy would be refitting the ship to make it properly capable of military operations. The Armada indicated that delivery was expected in mid-1942, but declined to cite a price for the ship.

The Armada spokesman noted, "Russia did offer to complete the sale of a converted aircraft carrier ordered by our previous government. Although the Russian terms were generous, the Armada felt the newer Italian ship was a more suitable vessel for our needs. Therefore, the Armada has thanked Russia for the offer, but declined and renounced any theoretical claim to the vessel in question."

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Wednesday, January 4th 2012, 4:52pm

Q4/41

Celebration...

The Marina de Guerra del Peru celebrates its 120th anniversary as well as the 62nd anniversary of the Battle of Angamos. The fleet parades past Callao in full colors, while President Galvez, other dignitaries, and thousands of Peruvians observe the event. Subsequently, the battlecruiser Villar, cruiser Ancash, and torpedo-boat Ancon moor at the civilian sector of the port for public tours.

Prognostication...

The Marine de Guerra's self-diagnostic is drafted and forwarded to Cabinet for its review. The report's key recommendations are:

1. Downsizing of the Marina de Guerra to a level that can be sustained through indigenous production.

The only exceptions are to be capital ships that Peru simply can not build. As the report notes, this is already being implemented through the lucrative disposal of old cruisers and destroyers. Disposal of the two Atahualpa class battleships is recommended because while the ships are still reasonably capable for their age, the Marina de Guerre can not afford to build up appropriate screening forces for them and the exisitng fast, striking craft.

2. A focus on coastal defence, using a combination of fast striking craft, light forces, mines, submarines, airpower, and coastal batteries.

The Marina is perceived to be on the right track to see this through, as the 1942 estimates and 1943 projections demonstrate.

3. A tandem offensive combination of fast surface raiders and an effective submarine arm.

The Marina's acquisition of the ex-Caboto and construction of additional destroyers are expected to round out the former element satisfactorily. While an acceptable submarine force now exists, a strong arm of medium-range submarines, with minelaying capability, will accentuate this.

4. Separation of patrol and policing duties into a separate Coast Guard, with re-introduction of patrol capabilities on the Amazon watershed and Lake Titicaca.

The precise details and requirements of this new body are not greatly expounded upon, but the Marina de Guerra does note that it is working towards deploying 34 t patrol boats on the Amazon and Lake Titicaca.

5. Enhancement of shore facilities.

Most notably, the question of continuing to use Callao as the main naval base arises. The explosive growth in the size of the fleet over the past decade has strained the capacity of Callao's naval yard to accommodate all the ships nominally based there. Even the expected down-sizing of the Marina de Guerra in the next couple of years is not expected to alleviate matters. Interference from civilian ships using the crowded port, and the sense that Callao itself is too large to keep foreign spies out of, are also issues. Options include expanding the base along the port's northwestern breakwater, or developing a new base, probably at Chimbote.

Potential disposal of the Atahualpas allows for the possibility of establishing strong shore batteries to defend Peruvian naval bases.

6. Establishment of a Naval Air Arm

This would include the existing floatplanes deployed on MdG, the expected air group for the ex-Caboto, and, more controversially, existing and proposed Air Force maritime strike and surveilance aircraft.

Renovation

It's a curious sight at the Callao float base. Two of the Air Force's enormous H6K5 flying boats are being gutted. Their weapons and ammunition are being removed, as are fittings for the gunners.

Meanwhile, the first of a number of crates has been dropped off by lorry. None is more than a couple of metres in length or too heavy for a group of men to move around.

An observer might assume these flying boats are being converted into air freighters; he might be right.

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Wednesday, January 4th 2012, 5:21pm

Quoted

Originally posted by The Rock Doctor
4. Separation of patrol and policing duties into a separate Coast Guard, with re-introduction of patrol capabilities on the Amazon watershed and Lake Titicaca.

The precise details and requirements of this new body are not greatly expounded upon, but the Marina de Guerra does note that it is working towards deploying 34 t patrol boats on the Amazon and Lake Titicaca.

Clarification question: we'd discussed that the final peace treaty between Peru and Colombia resulted in a demilitarization of the Peruvian Amazon region. Did Peru and Colombia negotiate an end to that facet of the treaty, or is Peru ignoring it?

It's not really something I'm concerned about, mind: I kinda counseled against a demilitarization clause, as if Peru's unable to police the region, then Colombia (and Brazil) run the risk of allowing guerrilla groups to fester there. I just want to get a sense of whether Peru's asking for permission or begging for forgiveness, as that'd affect my IC response.

And don't you already have some gunboats on Lake Titicaca? ?(

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Wednesday, January 4th 2012, 5:45pm

Please refer me to the discussion or treaty.

At the moment, this is a document sent to the Peruvian cabinet. The MdG has started working towards deploying patrol boats, but has not done so yet. There is nothing for you to react IC to.

As for Titicaca - beats me. Whatever is there is likely quite old.

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Wednesday, January 4th 2012, 6:47pm

Quoted

Originally posted by The Rock Doctor
There is nothing for you to react IC to.

No, but there will presumably be something to respond IC to in the future. I am perfectly aware that an IC response now would take OOC information. I wanted to clarify that information now so that I could make a considered response later - if I felt it necessary - when the time was right to do so.

Quoted

Originally posted by The Rock Doctor
Please refer me to the discussion or treaty.

There was no public discussion of it as it was all by PM. As Alvama took over playing Peru before we finished posting the war, no treaty was posted either. However, as I understood it, Mac and Wes determined that those terms included some manner of demilitarization of Peru's Amazon region.

Since the lack of a final peace treaty seems to be causing an issue here, perhaps we ought to get one worked out now. (Better late than never.)

Quoted

Originally posted by The Rock Doctor
As for Titicaca - beats me. Whatever is there is likely quite old.

It seems so; I can't find any information about if there was anything there to start with, actually.

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Wednesday, January 4th 2012, 6:58pm

Quoted

No, but there will presumably be something to respond IC to in the future. I am perfectly aware that an IC response now would take OOC information. I wanted to clarify that information now so that I could make a considered response later - if I felt it necessary - when the time was right to do so.


Indeed. So when that future time arises, ask me then for clarification. There is no need or benefit for me to predict what I'm going to do later, based on a very ambiguous situation now.

I look forward to seeing what the terms of the treaty are.

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Saturday, January 21st 2012, 3:06pm

Q/41...continued...

Coast Guards

Consultations within government indicate broad support for the creation of a Coast Guard.

The Marina itself is satisfied with the idea, as few of its personnel want to spend their time checking the manifest of a tramp freighter or fixing the engines of some broken-down fishing boat.

Foreign Affairs suggests that turning over riverine and lacustrine policing duties to a Coast Guard would likely be more palatable to Peru's neighbours.

Acquisition of assets is greenlighted, with new construction to begin in 1942. One or two civilian ships are also to be pressed into service in specialized roles.

Don't Forget the Air Corps

Though somewhat lost in the whole kerfuffle about the Marina, the Air Corps notes that it has a fair number of obsolete aircraft still in service, and that these are outclassed and outnumbered by Chilean, Brazilean, and Colombian units. It seeks permission to approach Italian and Iberian suppliers for additional numbers of fighter and attack aircraft already put into service.

Tenders for transport and utility aircraft are also proposed, though this may be cast wider. Given past experience, the notion of "offsets" is recommended to be dropped.

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Sunday, January 22nd 2012, 4:15am

Quoted

Originally posted by The Rock Doctor

Tenders for transport and utility aircraft are also proposed, though this may be cast wider. Given past experience, the notion of "offsets" is recommended to be dropped.




OOC: Wiser heads prevail. This bodes well for the future. ;)