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Today, 3:33am

Author: Brockpaine

Bulgarian Air Force Update, 1949

DAR-17 Tormozya (Saab 29 Tunnan) The DAR-17 Tormozya ("Badger") was a license-built Saab Tunnan, constructed by Bulgaria's State Aircraft Workshops (DAR) using Nordish-manufactured parts kits. Early aircraft used approximately 90% Nordish-supplied equipment, this percentage dropped to approximately 50% by the delivery of the first hundred aircraft. The Tormozya differed only slightly from the Nordish Tunnan, substituting French 23mm DEFA rotary cannon for the Hispano 20mm guns used by the Nordis...

Today, 3:30am

Author: Brockpaine

Bulgarian Air Force Update, 1949

DAR-17 Pcheloyad Utility Aircraft In May 1947, the Bulgarian State Aircraft Workshops (Derzhavna Aeroplanna Rabotilnitsa, or DAR) negotiated a license to build the Antonov An-2 light transport. The resulting aircraft entered production in January 1948 under the designation DAR-17 Pcheloyad ("Bee-eater"). Twelve aircraft were built for the Bulgarian Air Force, while further quantities were delivered to civil aviation customers in Bulgaria, Romania and Czechoslovakia. General characteristics - Cre...

Today, 3:29am

Author: Brockpaine

Bulgarian Air Force Update, 1949

Kaproni-Balgarski KB-9-II Bekas The KB-9-II Bekas was a significant modernization of the earlier KB-9, which first entered service in 1940 as a six-seat, twin-engine liaison aircraft. The aircraft featured upgraded avionics, improved controls, and a number of ease-of-manufacturing improvements. One of the most significant changes was the substitution of Russian-designed Tumansky turboprops for the original Argus V-12 engines, which provided one-fifth more horsepower for a minor increase in weigh...

Today, 3:27am

Author: Brockpaine

Bulgarian Air Force Update, 1949

Kaproni-Balgarski KB-14 Bora The Caproni Bora was developed in Italy by the Caproni aviation manufacturer. The Italians needed a sturdy, low-maintenance tactical airlifter and transport both for use in the Italian Metropole and in their African territories. Caproni analyzed similar aircraft entering service elsewhere in the world and incorporated many of their features into their final design, which first flew in January 1947 and entered service with the Italian military in December of 1948. The...

Today, 3:27am

Author: Brockpaine

Bulgarian Air Force Update, 1949

VNVV Order of Battle, June 1949: - 1x Strike Aviation Brigade - 3x Fighter Orlyaks - 1x Fighter Orlyak (reserve unit with stored equipment) - 1x Maritime Fighter Orlyak - 2x Tactical Bomber Orlyaks - 1x Bomber Orlyak - 3x Army Cooperation Orlyaks - 1x Army Cooperation Orlyak (reserve unit with stored equipment) - 5x Transport Orlyaks - 6x Military Flying Schools Strike Aviation Brigade 1st Fighter Orlyak -- 3rd Fighter Yato (18x BCAC Spitefuls, 1x Bf-108 Taifun) -- 4th Fighter Yato (18x BCAC Spi...

Today, 3:24am

Author: Brockpaine

Bulgarian Air Force Update, 1949

Bulgarian Air Force, 1950 It's been awhile since I've given much of an update to the Bulgarian Royal Air Force (VNVV) in any sort of detail. This should give you an idea of where the VNVV currently stands, and some ideas into where it might be going. Overview Overall, the VNVV's focus has always looked primarily toward air defense and army cooperation, including tactical bombing. As a result, Bulgaria fields an oversized force of fighters, primarily focused on the interceptor role, as well as nu...

Yesterday, 10:54pm

Author: Brockpaine

RE: Out of Service

Quoted from "M_Fredi" The planes owned by the first squadron, included the first of this planes, are reserved for different museums across Greece. The rest of the they will be stoked and are offered to any nation or private museum that want to acquire any of this ones. The Musée de l'air et de l'espace in Le Bourget (France) requests three Ierax fighters (one for display, and the other two for parts and spares).

Tuesday, April 7th 2020, 5:05am

Author: Brockpaine

German News and Events 1949

Quoted from "BruceDuncan" The Greek air arm is to receive, inter alia: thirty six Bücker Bü181 training aircraft from Luftwaffe surplus stocks; twenty four examples of the Bayerischen Flugzeugwerke Bf243 training aircraft; seventy-two Bayerischen Flugzeugwerke Bf262A fighter aircraft, plus twelve Bf262B fighter-training aircraft; twenty-five examples of the Arado Ar232 transport aircraft, and forty-two examples of the Dornier Do27 light utility aircraft. Deliveries are expected to begin by the ...

Monday, April 6th 2020, 8:09pm

Author: Brockpaine

French News, 1949

Quoted from "Hood" Methinks we haven't heard the last of the Lefkis. The Royal Navy will nod sagely, they will suspect a neat job by some Italian frogmen. Italy:

Monday, April 6th 2020, 2:27am

Author: Brockpaine

French News, 1949

HD.790 Speed Record Monday, April 18, 1949 - The Dewoitine HD.790 seaplane, constructed by a team of Supaero students led by aeronautical engineer Charles Beaumont, seized the world speed record for the fastest propeller-driven seaplane. The HD.790, under the command of test pilot Louis-Antoine Messiaen, achieved an average speed of 731.1 kilometers per hour over a measured course. Messiaen made a second flight later in the day, but the Bugatti engine overheated and was written off. Freighter Le...

Sunday, April 5th 2020, 7:49pm

Author: Brockpaine

New Designs and Refits of the Greek Fleet

I'll echo Wes's comments. Perhaps I can offer a bit of a reality check by addressing the mathematics. I'm not sure which 6" gun the Greeks used in 1940, but I suspect it's either a licensed or exported variant of the British 6"/50 Mark XXIII gun. That's already a pretty good gun for this period, with 6-8 rounds per minute. The necessary automation during this era will add in around 50% as much weight as a standard breech-loading gun. Therefore, you'd end up with two barrels instead of three. Tha...

Thursday, April 2nd 2020, 10:52pm

Author: Brockpaine

New Designs and Refits of the Greek Fleet

I guess what I'm feeling about the design is that it tries to load quite a lot of guns and equipment into a very small hull. The closest Russian equivalent of this design, at least in terms of size, is the 1944-dated Soobrazitelny class. That uses only 4x130mm (and 2x75mm) on slightly less tonnage and similar dimensions. The closest French equivalents are the Jaguar - Saber - Cimeterre class, with 6x100mm on a similar hull and displacement. The 1949 Russian and French destroyers are significantl...

Thursday, April 2nd 2020, 8:20pm

Author: Brockpaine

Irish Aircraft Developments, 1948-1950

Since 1942, the Irish Air Corps has been collecting their pocket change and watching aviation trends elsewhere in Europe. Although few aircraft have been acquired, several very important developments have taken place during this period. Bases In the 1930s and early 1940s, the entire IAC's force of aircraft crowded into Casement Aerodrome in Baldonnel. This proved... impractical. As a result, the IAC built a second base at Kilmacthomas, in southern Ireland. Kilmacthomas largely serves as a traini...

Thursday, April 2nd 2020, 5:26pm

Author: Brockpaine

New Designs and Refits of the Greek Fleet

Quoted from "M_Fredi" - Cross-sectional: 0,45 Now it drops below the 0.50 minimum hull strength.

Monday, March 30th 2020, 5:13am

Author: Brockpaine

Competition for new greek artillery

Okay, the modified spec is less confusing. France proposes the gold-standard 81mm Brandt: Quoted from "Brockpaine" Mortier de 81mm Mle1927/1931 (Brandt) Type : Medium mortar Crew : 1 NCO + 5 men (+ 1 driver) Caliber : 81.4 mm Barrel length : 1267.5mm Weight in action : 58.5kg (18.5kg barrel, 18kg bipod, 1.5kg sight, 20.5kg base plate) Elevation : 45° - 85° Traverse : depending from the elevation (8° - 12°) Rate of fire : 20 rpm (up to 30 rpm in intense fire with a trained crew) Pretty much every...

Monday, March 30th 2020, 4:15am

Author: Brockpaine

RE: RE: RE: Competition for new greek artillery

Quoted from "M_Fredi" Quoted OOC, I'm not sure I follow your terms here. I'd say a light mortar is something like a 60mm (or potentially even an 81mm) mortar with a weight between 20 to 60 kg. A medium mortar would be a 105mm unit. The weights and calibers suggested imply a weapon of significantly greater size. Can you please clarify? Of course. Since the unique distinction that I found between mortars was an infantry mortar and a heavy mortar. Even the definition of light mortar is unclear. Fo...

Monday, March 30th 2020, 3:34am

Author: Brockpaine

RE: Competition for new greek artillery

Quoted from "M_Fredi" Mountain cannon/Howitzer: There is no restriction about this canon except that it is possible the greek army should be allowed to build it under license. France offers the Canon de montagne Modele 1945 Schneider, a thoroughly modern, lightweight 105mm mountain gun. Quoted from "M_Fredi" Field cannon: Any file cannot presented should have at least a caliper 100mm and not more than 160 mm. France offers the Obusier de 155 mm Modèle 44. Quoted from "M_Fredi" Light mortar: Mus...

Saturday, March 28th 2020, 10:12pm

Author: Brockpaine

Peruvian News and Events, 1949

Quoted from "BruceDuncan" Quoted from "Brockpaine" Quoted from "BruceDuncan" You have the better of me. What previous Ollanta? The Ollanta was built in 1930, I believe. But it's just now entering service...? It is re-entering service. I have presumed that during the period between her original entry into service and the present point in game time, she fell out of service (perhaps due to hostilities? I do not know how that part of the Andean War might have worked out in detail) and required reco...

Saturday, March 28th 2020, 9:14pm

Author: Brockpaine

Peruvian News and Events, 1949

Quoted from "BruceDuncan" You have the better of me. What previous Ollanta? The Ollanta was built in 1930, I believe. But it's just now entering service...?

Saturday, March 28th 2020, 8:06pm

Author: Brockpaine

Peruvian News and Events, 1949

Quoted from "BruceDuncan" The Peruvian Times (Lima), 26 September 1949 The steamer Ollanta made her maiden round-trip voyage across Lake Titicaca yesterday to inaugurate a daily service between the port of Puno and the Bolivian port of Guaqui. Passenger service on the lake has been disrupted for many years, and its re-establishment is seen as a great step forward in the development of the entire region. What did you do with the previous Ollanta? ?(