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Yesterday, 7:07pm

Author: Brockpaine

British Army 1950

Quoted from "Hood" This variant was a further refinement of the Mk.III. The main change was the new diesel engine, developed to address the range and speed issues. 400 tanks were built Royal Ordnance and Leyland from 1948 and the type was also an export success with sales to Australia, Chile, Egypt, Greece, Iraq, Ireland and Switzerland; Chile, Greece and Switzerland all having specified a Swiss 88mm main gun. Just a quick minor comment: the Irish and Swiss tanks are actually Mk.II models, not ...

Thursday, September 17th 2020, 6:54pm

Author: Brockpaine

British Empire News 1949

Is this Bulganov fellow Russian, or is he an expat?

Monday, August 31st 2020, 5:43am

Author: Brockpaine

Russian Naval Infantry

Overview The Russian Naval Infantry (Morskaya pekhota Rossii), sometimes called the Russian Marine Corps, are a branch of the Russian Navy that specializes in amphibious assault. They are a separate unit from the Coastal Defense Artillery. Organization The standard unit of the Russian Naval Infantry is a brigade. A brigade is composed of: -- 3x infantry battalions -- 1x artillery battalion with 122mm howitzers -- 1x mortar battery (120mm) -- 2x mortar batteries (82mm) -- 1x logistics company -- ...

Friday, August 28th 2020, 2:46pm

Author: Brockpaine

Greek army.

The Republic of France is willing to sell AMX-40B3 tanks to the Greek Army. Similarly, the Russian Federation is willing to sell the T-45 Grom and T-47 Tsiklon to the Greek Army. The Czechs (Skoda) and Polish would also offer various designs, some of which are getting slightly outdated and some of which haven't appeared in service yet. * * * * * OOC: that said, my personal opinion is that the Centurion is probably by far the best choice for the Greeks. It ticks off all of the boxes for what I th...

Thursday, August 20th 2020, 10:57pm

Author: Brockpaine

A Question

Well, that's fine. Have you considered perhaps listening to the Bilgepumps podcast instead? He does more of a roundtable discussion with Drachinifel and ArmouredCarriers.com talking about various naval events. Different sort of setup, and two other noted naval historians also contributing.

Tuesday, August 18th 2020, 5:54am

Author: Brockpaine

A Question of Philosophy

Quoted from "BruceDuncan" As an example, I have consulted the official Statistical Digest of the Second World War which details Britain’s output of munitions and other equipment. The figures for .303in rifles for 1938 give me a clue: ... This seems extremely low. I think that production numbers alone won't be indicative. It's worth pointing out that the British aren't actively trying to replace the SMLE in 1938 - they were working on various projects including semi-automatic rifles, which of co...

Monday, August 17th 2020, 2:59am

Author: Brockpaine

A Question

Quoted from "thesmilingassassin" I'd love to see him debate these posters with regards to each others views so I can assess just how "knowledgeable" these posters are. If you'd like, I could invite him to do so...?

Monday, August 17th 2020, 12:21am

Author: Brockpaine

RE: RE: RE: A Question

Quoted from "BruceDuncan" I am glad to hear that his output is improving. I shall have to see if I can find some of his more recent work and reconsider my opinions. I'd recommend his introduction videos (for instance, this one or this one) rather than his livestreams. Dr. Clarke views the introduction videos as a "lecture" whereas the livestreams are a lot more loosely-organized - viewers asking questions (sometimes very off-topic) and getting answers, so on and so forth. I enjoy the livestream...

Sunday, August 16th 2020, 11:21pm

Author: Brockpaine

RE: A Question

Quoted from "thesmilingassassin" I'm part of several facebook pages that discuss warships and after posting a video from Alexander Clarke they basically brushed it off as rubbish which to me was surprising to say the least. Has anyone here who watches Dr. Alexander Clarke's videos on warships ever disagreed with a large portion of what he says? So I've watched a large portion of his videos, and I'm also a moderator both for his live-chats and his Discord server. Bruce's comment about AC's produ...

Saturday, August 15th 2020, 4:12pm

Author: Brockpaine

A More “What If” Sort of Question

Quoted from "Hood" Imagine the effects if Britain was forced to cede control of Egypt... With the best will in the world, I just don't see that happening. Especially not after the RN shows up off the Italian coast with five R-class, five QEs, two Nelsons, and the battlecruisers. Royal Navy: "Hey, what's up girls?" Regia Marina: "Not much, just helping the boss invade Ethiopia and Egypt." Royal Navy: "Yeah, we saw that. You know, I happen to have an interest in Egypt myself." Regia Marina: "Oh."...

Wednesday, August 12th 2020, 11:43pm

Author: Brockpaine

A Question of Philosophy

I think my own response would be the construction of a batch of light destroyers in much the same design lineage as the Royal Navy's Hunt-class. These ships are fast enough to be a threat, cheap enough to be common (and multi-purpose enough to be dangerous to other things), have enough protection to survive damage from an MTB's limited anti-surface weapons, and have enough firepower on their own merits to put down an MTB in very short order. Go ahead and fit some of them as antisubmarine ships, ...

Saturday, August 8th 2020, 5:56pm

Author: Brockpaine

Meanwhile, in Russia: 1949

Excerpts from the Reports of the British Naval Attache Excerpts from the official reports of Commander Michael Denny, RN, British Naval Attache to the Russian Federation, Q3 / 1949 Visit to Tallinn - July -- Toured Russian cruiser Rynda and destroyer Samarakand. -- Observed sailing of two Russian submarines (S-9 and S-4). -- Toured incomplete Project 88B landing ship MDK-21 in shipyards. -- Viewed platoon-level exercises of Russian special unit marines (so-called "Spetsnaz") using folding and in...

Saturday, August 8th 2020, 5:20pm

Author: Brockpaine

French News, 1949

Army Promotions and Transfers Wednesday, August 3, 1949 - Jean de Lattre de Tassigny was appointed to the chief of the Armoured Cavalry Branch, replacing Philippe Leclerc, who was killed in an air crash two weeks ago. General Marcel Carpentier was in turn appointed Commander-in-Chief in North Africa, replacing de Lattre. In an unrelated move, General Joseph Levavasseur was appointed to take command of army forces in the French Somali Coast. Voisin and Hennequin Wednesday, August 10, 1949 - With ...

Saturday, August 8th 2020, 5:03pm

Author: Brockpaine

A More “What If” Sort of Question

Quoted from "Hood" Closing the Suez Canal to all Italian traffic, drastic step but not much Italy can do about it unless they want to invade Egypt and that's probably not a good idea. Any Italian ships then have to go via the Cape and are open to more interference, e.g. all British and French ports in Africa closed to them. This, and arming Ethiopia with some modern weapons, are the drastic steps I think might actually work. French Djibouti has the port which feeds the only period railway into ...

Saturday, August 1st 2020, 3:32pm

Author: Brockpaine

A Question of Philosophy

I like that carrier design overall, although I'm somewhat worried about the thickness of the deck armour. It seems like just enough armour to fuse an AP bomb, and not enough to stop it... Quoted from "Hood" A few of us tried to keep tabs on manpower but that faded away. I still keep tabs on that, actually, although I don't make much effort to track its growth (and it's almost always growth, never reduction) over time. -- Russia: 209,003 men -- France: 106,730 men -- Chile: 38,113 men

Wednesday, July 29th 2020, 1:15am

Author: Brockpaine

Unternehmen Wachsame Entschlossenheit

Quoted from "BruceDuncan" Conceived by the Imperial German naval staff as a rather desperate attempt to turn the flank of the Tsarist armies Unternehmen Albion had succeeded all too well, taking advantage of the war-weariness of the Russian people and the abdication of the Tsar to convince Russia to leave the Great War. OOC: Here in WWTL, I wouldn't attach as much importance to Operation Albion. Russia certainly does not view it as a decisive battle, but rather as a largely symbolic attempt to ...

Tuesday, July 28th 2020, 4:27am

Author: Brockpaine

A Question of Philosophy

I think the refit system we have in WW is particularly punishing for refits and reconstructions, unfortunately. I've encountered a lot of that with the Russian destroyer flotillas up until about 1940, which aren't economical to rebuild, yet cost too much to replace except over the long term.

Tuesday, July 28th 2020, 12:11am

Author: Brockpaine

A Question of Philosophy

Quoted from "thesmilingassassin" It would be interesting to start Atlantean infrastructure at say 1880 and progress pre-dreadnaught building program's up to the dreadnaught age rather than start at the Cleito/Washington treaty stage and base infrastructure on ships in service. I've kinda thought the same about an AU French Fleet between 1880 and 1940. A lot of the older designs, particularly from 1900 to 1915, were of such poor quality, largely due to lack of foresight about strategy and tactic...

Saturday, July 25th 2020, 7:06pm

Author: Brockpaine

A Question of Philosophy

Quoted from "BruceDuncan" (3) A large fleet carrier approximating the size and capabilities of the OTL Essex class. Of approximately 25,000 tons it has a speed of approximately 34 knots and can operate between 75 and 84 aircraft according to our rules. I'd always pick this option over the other two types presented. (Although I'd prefer an Audacious analog to an Essex analog; still, I don't know what the past design history has been.) If the fleet already has a small carrier from earlier decades...